Department of English

Erica Brozovsky


Postdoctoral FellowPh.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Postdoctoral Lecturer
Erica Brozovsky

Contact

Interests


Sociolinguistics, language variation and change, bicultural identity, Texas English, Asian American literature

Biography


Erica Brozovsky is a sociolinguist and lover of language variation. Her research centers on Taiwanese Americans in Texas, examining how language is used in the construction of identity alignments. Dr. Brozovsky's current project focuses on mixed-race Taiwanese Americans and how they situate themselves in the multicultural American landscape, investigating what it means to be bicultural and how they perform, both at and below the level of consciousness, the identities they have created for themselves.

Courses


E 314V • Asian American Lit/Cul-Wb

35575 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
CDWr (also listed as AAS 314)

E 314V  l  2-Asian American Literature and Culture-WB

 

Instructor:  Brozovsky, E

Unique #:  35575

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  AAS 314, 32480

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  As the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States, the Asian population has made an indelible mark on American culture.  However, as a community and as individuals, they must continually negotiate the tensions between life in the United States and ties to their “cultural homelands,” answering the question: What has it meant, and what does it mean to be “Asian American?”

 

This course will explore how Asian American literature attempts to negotiate these tensions.  Through the lens of 20th and 21st century Asian American novels and short stories, we will explore issues of nationhood, ethnicity, race, and gender in the project of constructing “Asian-American” identity.  We will attempt to unpack the ways in which literary texts assert belonging, negotiate the immigrant experience, and balance the demands of different cultural traditions.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains both a cultural diversity flag and a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Texts include:  Michelle Kuo - Reading with Patrick; Thi Bui - The Best We Could Do; Milton Murayama - All I asking for is my body; Lisa Ko – The Leavers; and other readings, provided on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70%-80% of the final grade).  There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (20%-30% of the final grade).

E 364T • Eng Lang, Its Socl Context-Wb

36215 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
CDIIWr

E 364T  l  The English Language and Its Social Context   l    Spring 2021

 

Instructor:  Brozovsky, E

Unique:  36215

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-listings:  none

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or Rhetoric and Writing.

 

Description:  The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the structure and sociolinguistic usage of American English.  Sociolinguistics seeks to explain the ways that language serves to define and maintain group identity and social relationships among speakers.  In this course, we will investigate the linguistic and social sources of language variation: what happens when languages come into contact, how dialects form, how and why language changes, and how and why different social groups (age, gender, ethnicity, class) speak differently.  We'll discuss the impact that cultural identity has on language use, and we'll learn how our understanding of the social life of language can be applied to language policies, both in education and in a larger context.  Throughout our examination of these issues, we will consider the quantitative methods that sociolinguists use to understand the significance of their data and research.  We will also investigate our own linguistic practices and examine how ideologies about linguistic variation have been used to invalidate particular ways of speaking and disempower speakers of these varieties, exploring the ways that language can reflect, reinforce, or ultimately contest social inequalities.  The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) and dialects they and their future pupils speak.

This course contains three flags:  cultural diversity, writing, and independent inquiry.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Possible Texts Include:  Rosina Lippi-Green – English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, 2011 • Walt Wolfram and Natalie Schilling – American English: Dialects and Variation, 2016 • Lisa Delpit and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy – The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on language and Culture in the ClassroomY'Shanda Young-Rivera, Kim Brian Lovejoy, Vershawn Ashanti Young, Rusty Barrett – Other People’s English: Code-meshing, Code-switching, and African American LiteracyOther readings, provided on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  For this course, you will complete two short papers (30%) and one final research project, including a paper of 10-15 pages in length (40%) and an in-class presentation (10%).  The remaining 20% will be determined by weekly reading responses, participation, and in-class group work.

E 314L • Banned Books/Novel Ideas-Wb

34315 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L    3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor:  Brozovsky, E

Unique #:  34315 and 34320

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  What could possibly be so wrong with a beloved picture book that it would get banned?  

 

In this course, we will read and discuss a range of children and young adult texts that have been banned or challenged since their publishing for a variety of reasons.  We will ask what qualities made these books appear threatening to those who argued that they be banned and will examine the contexts of each book’s suppression, asking what the work has to teach us about the societies in which it is banned.  The goal is to provoke wide-ranging discussions on both nostalgic and new texts that will intrigue and excite students on many levels.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Possible Texts include:  Where the Sidewalk Ends – Shel Silverstein; Drama — Raina Telgemeier; The Hate U Give — Angie Thomas; Speak — Laurie Halse Anderson; Looking for Alaska — John Green.  Selected picture books, short stories, poems, and essays made available on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Banned Books/Novel Ideas-Wb

34320 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L    3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor:  Brozovsky, E

Unique #:  34315 and 34320

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  What could possibly be so wrong with a beloved picture book that it would get banned?  

 

In this course, we will read and discuss a range of children and young adult texts that have been banned or challenged since their publishing for a variety of reasons.  We will ask what qualities made these books appear threatening to those who argued that they be banned and will examine the contexts of each book’s suppression, asking what the work has to teach us about the societies in which it is banned.  The goal is to provoke wide-ranging discussions on both nostalgic and new texts that will intrigue and excite students on many levels.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Possible Texts include:  Where the Sidewalk Ends – Shel Silverstein; Drama — Raina Telgemeier; The Hate U Give — Angie Thomas; Speak — Laurie Halse Anderson; Looking for Alaska — John Green.  Selected picture books, short stories, poems, and essays made available on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34925 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.102
Wr

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor:  Brozovsky, E

Unique #:  34925

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: What could possibly be so wrong with a beloved picture book that it would get banned?

 

In this course, we will read and discuss a range of children and young adult texts that have been banned or challenged since their publishing for a variety of reasons.  We will ask what qualities made these books appear threatening to those who argued that they be banned and will examine the contexts of each book’s suppression, asking what the workhas to teach us about the societies in which it is banned.  The goal is to provoke wide-ranging discussions on both nostalgic and new texts that will intrigue and excite students on many levels.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

PossibleTextsinclude: Where the Sidewalk Ends– Shel Silverstein, Where the Wild Things Are– Maurice Sendak,Green Eggs and Ham – Dr. Seuss, A Wrinkle in Time – Madeline L’Engle, The Hate U Give – Angie Thomas. Selected short stories, poems, and essays made available on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

E 314V • Asian American Lit & Culture

34445 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM FAC 7
CDWr (also listed as AAS 314)

E 314V  l  2-Asian American Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Brozovsky, E

Unique #:  34445

Semester:  Fall 2019. 

Cross-lists:  AAS 314

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: As the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States, the Asian population has made an indelible mark on American culture.  However, as a community and as individuals, they must continually negotiate the tensions between life in the United States and ties to their “cultural homelands,” answering the question: What has it meant, and what does it mean to be “Asian American?”

 

This course will explore how Asian American literature attempts to negotiate these tensions.  Through the lens of 20th and 21st century Asian American novels and short stories, we will explore issues of nationhood, ethnicity, race, and gender in the project of constructing “Asian-American” identity.  We will attempt to unpack the ways in which literary texts assert belonging, negotiate the immigrant experience, and balance the demands of different cultural traditions.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains both a cultural diversity flag and a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Possible texts include: Michelle Kuo, Reading with Patrick; Celeste Ng, Little Fires Everywhere;Chang-rae Lee, Native Speaker; Eddie Huang, Fresh Off the Boat;Selected short stories, essays, and poems from authors such as Mindy Kaling, Carlos Bulosan, Nam Le, Jhumpa Lahiri, etc.

 

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70%-80% of the final grade).  There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (20%-30% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Bicultural Identity

43600 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 7
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Bicultural Identity 

What do Kid Cudi, Olivia Wilde, and Louis CK have in common? And what about Eminem, Snooki, and Mindy Kaling? The members of the first group can be identified as multiracial: the children of parents of different ethnicities and races. The second group lends itself to a more multicultural lens: Eminem is not seen as just a rapper, but a white rapper; Snooki embodies the Italian-American guidette, but is in fact Chilean; and in the words of Mindy Kaling, “My parents raised me with the entitlement of a tall, white, blond man.” In this class we will examine mixed identity in both measures of race and of culture.

As globalization simultaneously shrinks the perceived distance between cultures and broadens our worldview, there has arisen a population of individuals who do not solely identify with one cultural ethnicity or community. From deciding which box to check on demographic forms to communicating with grandparents in makeshift sign due to language barriers, the offspring of multiculturalism often struggle with what unicultural people might consider innocuous tasks or decisions. What does it mean to be accused of “acting black” or, in the case of Rachel Dolezol, actually passing as black? How do people behave differently or speak differently in the various cultural spheres to which they belong? With this struggle comes the question of identity. Where do these people fit in?

Through a rhetorical lens, we will explore a multitude of topics including historical viewpoints on miscegenation (and the negative connotation the word conveys), third culture, the immigrant experience, diaspora, and loss of culture. We will examine the way our society talks about multiculturalism, and in turn, how the way we talk about it shapes the way that it exists. In this course, we will learn to engage critically with a variety of texts from laws to YouTube videos and evaluate them based on the rhetorical toolkit developed over the course of the semester. By researching credible sources, and writing and revising college-level papers, we will emerge at the end of the semester with a greater understanding of rhetoric, writing, and the multicultural world around us.

 

Required Textbooks and Handbooks

  • Everything’s an Argument, Andrea A. Lunsford, John J. Ruszkiewicz, & Keith Walters
  • Little Longhorn Handbook, Richard Bullock, Michal Brody, & Francine Weinberg

 

Selected Texts - Additional texts will be assigned in a course packet or distributed electronically. Authors may include: Jan Blommaert, David Pollock & Ruth Van Reken, Rutledge Dennis, Barack Obama, Trevor Noah, Vaidehi Muhumdar, Mary Bucholtz, and Emma Lazarus.

 

Course Assessment

  • Paper 1.1 – 10 %
  • Paper 2.1 – 10%
  • Paper 2.2 – Revision – 15%
  • Paper 3.1 – 10%
  • Paper 3.2 – Revision – 15%
  • Final Presentation – 10%
  • Short writing assignments (5 – 20%)
  • Participation (10%)
  • Peer Reviews (Mandatory)

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Bicultural Identity

44065 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 7
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Bicultural Identity 

What do Kid Cudi, Olivia Wilde, and Louis CK have in common? And what about Eminem, Snooki, and Mindy Kaling? The members of the first group can be identified as multiracial: the children of parents of different ethnicities and races. The second group lends itself to a more multicultural lens: Eminem is not seen as just a rapper, but a white rapper; Snooki embodies the Italian-American guidette, but is in fact Chilean; and in the words of Mindy Kaling, “My parents raised me with the entitlement of a tall, white, blond man.” In this class we will examine mixed identity in both measures of race and of culture.

As globalization simultaneously shrinks the perceived distance between cultures and broadens our worldview, there has arisen a population of individuals who do not solely identify with one cultural ethnicity or community. From deciding which box to check on demographic forms to communicating with grandparents in makeshift sign due to language barriers, the offspring of multiculturalism often struggle with what unicultural people might consider innocuous tasks or decisions. What does it mean to be accused of “acting black” or, in the case of Rachel Dolezol, actually passing as black? How do people behave differently or speak differently in the various cultural spheres to which they belong? With this struggle comes the question of identity. Where do these people fit in?

Through a rhetorical lens, we will explore a multitude of topics including historical viewpoints on miscegenation (and the negative connotation the word conveys), third culture, the immigrant experience, diaspora, and loss of culture. We will examine the way our society talks about multiculturalism, and in turn, how the way we talk about it shapes the way that it exists. In this course, we will learn to engage critically with a variety of texts from laws to YouTube videos and evaluate them based on the rhetorical toolkit developed over the course of the semester. By researching credible sources, and writing and revising college-level papers, we will emerge at the end of the semester with a greater understanding of rhetoric, writing, and the multicultural world around us.

 

Required Textbooks and Handbooks

  • Everything’s an Argument, Andrea A. Lunsford, John J. Ruszkiewicz, & Keith Walters
  • Little Longhorn Handbook, Richard Bullock, Michal Brody, & Francine Weinberg

 

Selected Texts - Additional texts will be assigned in a course packet or distributed electronically. Authors may include: Jan Blommaert, David Pollock & Ruth Van Reken, Rutledge Dennis, Barack Obama, Trevor Noah, Vaidehi Muhumdar, Mary Bucholtz, and Emma Lazarus.

 

Course Assessment

  • Paper 1.1 – 10 %
  • Paper 2.1 – 10%
  • Paper 2.2 – Revision – 15%
  • Paper 3.1 – 10%
  • Paper 3.2 – Revision – 15%
  • Final Presentation – 10%
  • Short writing assignments (5 – 20%)
  • Participation (10%)
  • Peer Reviews (Mandatory)

Curriculum Vitae


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