Department of English

James Garner


Postdoctoral FellowPh.D, The University of Texas at Austin

Postdoctoral Lecturer

Contact

Courses


E 314L • Banned Books/Novel Ideas-Wb

35510 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas-WB

 

Instructor:  Garner, J

Unique #:  35510

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  none

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  What makes a book dangerous?  For that matter, what makes an idea dangerous?  And at what point is censoring supposedly dangerous ideas, well, dangerous?  This class will take up these questions and many more as we read four books—as well as several essays and short stories--that are about the censorship of books, ideas, and cultures, to one extent or another.  We will begin the course by framing our inquiry around excerpts from John Milton’s Areopagitica, the Paradise Lost poet’s defense of a free press, before we move on to more recent novels that deal with the reasons that cultures censor ideas, the power of books to destabilize political authority, and the benefits of, as Milton put it, “books promiscuously read.”

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Required Texts:  George Orwell, 1984; Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo; Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  Other graded material may include:  short presentations, daily discussion questions, and quizzes (25% of the final grade).

E 321 • Shakespeare-Wb

36045 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
GCWr

E 321  l  Shakespeare-WB

 

Instructor:  Garner, J

Unique #:  36045

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  none

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  In this course, we will consider several of Shakespeare’s plays and their relationship to one of the most important intellectual resources used in the composition of early modern plays and poetry: the art of rhetoric.  As many scholars have argued, rhetoric as learned from the writings of Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian was a vital and lively discourse in early modern England and a core part of the educational system.  Despite the enthusiasm for rhetoric, it was also subject to suspicion and skepticism as a way to manipulate the gullible into doing your bidding.  Our focus will be on how Shakespeare’s plays draw upon the discourse(s) of rhetoric and they deal with some core questions of rhetorical theory:  What is the proper relationship between politics and rhetoric? How do you persuade an audience who is against you? What are the ethics of using rhetoric to manipulate others to achieve your ends? And can rhetoric ever be a positive force for social change?  To examine such questions, we will focus on primary rhetorical texts with which Shakespeare and his contemporaries likely would have been familiar, and we will examine plays in which the arts of persuasion command the spotlight, including King Richard III, Julius Caesar, Love’s Labour’s Lost, and Pericles, among others.  Secondary reading on early modern history and Shakespeare's biography, style, and relationship to rhetorical theory will enhance our reading.

 

Recommended Text:  I recommend The Norton Shakespeare, ed. Stephen Greenblatt (ISBN #978-0393602333).  However, you may use any scholarly edition of Shakespeare's works (in single-volume version or as separate paperbacks).  Please check with the instructor if you have questions about the suitability of an edition or editions.  I will provide additional readings as PDFs on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading (subject to change upon notice):  This course carries a writing flag and will include a short close reading paper in which you analyze Shakespeare’s use of a rhetorical technique (10%), a historicization paper (20%), and a final research paper or creative project and reflection (30%).  In addition to these papers, you will write several shorter reading responses (10%, combined), make a formal presentation on a rhetorical figure (15%), and participate meaningfully in class (15%).  Regular attendance and participation are required.

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34945 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.118
Wr

E 314L l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor:  Garner, J

Unique #:  34945

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: What makes a book dangerous?  For that matter, what makes an idea dangerous? And at what point is censoring supposedly dangerous ideas, well, dangerous?  This class will take up these questions and many more as we read three books—as well as several essays and short stories--that are about the censorship of books, ideas, and cultures, to one extent or another.  We will begin the course by framing our inquiry around excerpts from John Milton’s Areopagitica, the Paradise Lost poet’s defense of a free press, before we move on to more recent novels that deal with the reasons that cultures censor ideas, the power of books to destabilize political authority, and the benefits of, as Milton put it, “books promiscuously read.”

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

RequiredTexts: Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo; Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis

 

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  Other graded material may include: short presentations, daily discussion questions, and quizzes (25% of the final grade).

RHE 309S • Crit Read/Persuasive Writ-Hon

43395 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM RLP 1.102
Wr

The aim in this course is to develop a better understanding and mastery of rhetoric--the art of persuasion--an art that's essential not only for your college work, but also for your participation as a citizen in a democracy. You already know this art instinctively: every day, all day, you're immersed in rhetoric. But our goal in this course is to become more consciously and effectively rhetorical.

To accomplish this goal, we'll study a discourse that is inherently related both to the rhetorical tradition and modern politics: tolerance. Tolerance has been a major part of political discussions at least since the 16th century, and it persists as a buzzword in the media. We describe people who hold certain attitudes as being tolerant or intolerant. Stories of intolerance on college campuses flood the 24-hour news cycle. Tolerance becomes tricky as we try to define the limits of what we’re willing to tolerate. But as we’ll find in this class, tolerance as a philosophical, political, and—most importantly for our purposes—rhetorical stance is a lot more complicated than popular media presents it. These tensions make tolerance a robust and important discourse worth studying. 

This course—and its assignments—will challenge you to think differently, to question age-old assumptions, and to engage in argument as part of a larger community. You’ll complete assignments analyzing rhetoric (why are particular arguments persuasive to some audiences and not others, for instance?), as well as write persuasive arguments geared toward specific audiences. We’ll complete a number of peer reviews and workshops to help you grow as writers and thinkers. This course isn't for the faint of heart—we’ll occasionally discuss controversial topics in this class, but always in the service of intellectual growth. If you're a hard worker, you like to share your thoughts, and you're interested in what rhetoric and politics have to do with one another, then this is the class for you.

Assignments:

  • Paper 1.1 – 5%
  • Paper 1.2 – 10%
  • Paper 2 – 10%
  • Paper 2.1 – 15%
  • Paper 3 – 25%
  • Short Assignments – 20%
  • Even Shorter Assignments – 15%

Readings:

  • Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker. Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers. Pearson, 2010.
  • EasyWriter with 2016 MLA Update by Andrea A. Lunsford

Other readings will be provided to you by your instructor online and in PDF form.

RHE 309S • Crit Read And Persuasive Writ

43759 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 206
Wr

The aim in this course is to develop a better understanding and mastery of rhetoric--the art of persuasion--an art that's essential not only for your college work, but also for your participation as a citizen in a democracy. You already know this art instinctively: every day, all day, you're immersed in rhetoric. But our goal in this course is to become more consciously and effectively rhetorical.

To accomplish this goal, we'll study a discourse that is inherently related both to the rhetorical tradition and modern politics: tolerance. Tolerance has been a major part of political discussions at least since the 16th century, and it persists as a buzzword in the media. We describe people who hold certain attitudes as being tolerant or intolerant. Stories of intolerance on college campuses flood the 24-hour news cycle. Tolerance becomes tricky as we try to define the limits of what we’re willing to tolerate. But as we’ll find in this class, tolerance as a philosophical, political, and—most importantly for our purposes—rhetorical stance is a lot more complicated than popular media presents it. These tensions make tolerance a robust and important discourse worth studying. 

This course—and its assignments—will challenge you to think differently, to question age-old assumptions, and to engage in argument as part of a larger community. You’ll complete assignments analyzing rhetoric (why are particular arguments persuasive to some audiences and not others, for instance?), as well as write persuasive arguments geared toward specific audiences. We’ll complete a number of peer reviews and workshops to help you grow as writers and thinkers. This course isn't for the faint of heart—we’ll occasionally discuss controversial topics in this class, but always in the service of intellectual growth. If you're a hard worker, you like to share your thoughts, and you're interested in what rhetoric and politics have to do with one another, then this is the class for you.

Assignments:

  • Paper 1.1 – 5%
  • Paper 1.2 – 10%
  • Paper 2 – 10%
  • Paper 2.1 – 15%
  • Paper 3 – 25%
  • Short Assignments – 20%
  • Even Shorter Assignments – 15%

Readings:

  • Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker. Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers. Pearson, 2010.
  • EasyWriter with 2016 MLA Update by Andrea A. Lunsford

Other readings will be provided to you by your instructor online and in PDF form.

E 314L • Goodreads

34970 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 302
Wr

E 314L  l  10-GoodReads

 

Instructor:  Garner, J

Unique #:  34970

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Of the many preoccupations of literature, tales of vengeance remain a perennial interest with much to say about the societies and cultural contexts from which they arise.  From the revenge tragedies of the ancient Romans to more recent crime fiction, stories about revenge offer a deceptively simple starting point for philosophical inquiry about a variety of topics including justice, political organization, free will, the law, and power—just to name a few.  In this class, we’ll take up these concerns and more as we consider the aesthetic, ethical, and rhetorical qualities that have made stories of retribution and reprisal a significant and recurring theme in literature.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Shakespeare – Titus Andronicus; Cormac McCarthy – No Country for Old Men; Gillian Flynn – Gone Girl.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There will also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

 

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Rebellion

44090 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM JES A209A
Wr

“When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.” - The Declaration of Independence (1776)

 

Although the idea of “rebellion” is often burdened with negative connotations, it occupies a place of particular fascination in American society; in our popular culture, we love underdogs, outlaws, and rule-breakers, and even America’s very inception happened through an act of defiance. From the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the mayhem caused by internet hacktivists like Anonymous, “rebellion” takes many forms, occurring when the oppressed finally says, “Enough.” What is it, though, that makes someone a rebel? And what does it mean to rebel? Must rebellion always end with violence, or can resistance be peaceable? How has rebellion changed in shape and scope over time? And from where does the authority derive that these rebels challenge? How does rebellion start with the ideas of a few and expand to the masses? What happens when rebellion becomes fashionable? And, most important for our purposes, what is the value of persuasive rhetoric and argumentation in challenging authority?

We will consider these questions and more by surveying a broad array of arguments regarding the many forms that rebellion takes. This course will consider a variety of “rebellious” texts, including political treatises and manifestoes spanning from the English Civil War to the present; hip-hop, punk, and folk music; and visual media such as graffiti and internet memes, to name just a few. We will also explore informative secondary research critiquing and elaborating these texts’ arguments to develop a vocabulary and conceptual framework for talking about rebellion. In our analysis of rebellion, we will examine a number of important interrelated issues that arise while considering the persuasive efforts made by these texts, including the origins of authority, the relationship between a people and their government, the legitimacy of rebellion, and the conditions that generally lead to rebellion. Because this course has a writing flag, it will be writing intensive; to fulfill the requirements, students will compose and revise three longer papers (each between 5-8 pages in length, including their own persuasive call for rebellion, which will also be delivered orally), as well as write a handful of shorter assignments.

 

Assignments and Grading

  • Paper 1.1:  Advisory grade
  • Paper 1.2: 10%
  • Paper 2.1: 15%
  • Paper 2.2: 15% 
  • Paper 3.1: 15%
  • Paper 3.2: 15%
  • Short Writing Assignments: 25%
  • Presentation: 5%

Required Texts and Course Readings

  • John W. Bowers, Donovan J. Ochs, Richard J. Jensen, and David P. Schulz. The Rhetoric of Agitation and Control, Third Edition. 2009.  
  • Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker. Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers. Pearson, 2010.
  • Andrea Lunsford. Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. 

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Rebellion

44010 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 206
Wr

“When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.” - The Declaration of Independence (1776)

 

Although the idea of “rebellion” is often burdened with negative connotations, it occupies a place of particular fascination in American society; in our popular culture, we love underdogs, outlaws, and rule-breakers, and even America’s very inception happened through an act of defiance. From the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the mayhem caused by internet hacktivists like Anonymous, “rebellion” takes many forms, occurring when the oppressed finally says, “Enough.” What is it, though, that makes someone a rebel? And what does it mean to rebel? Must rebellion always end with violence, or can resistance be peaceable? How has rebellion changed in shape and scope over time? And from where does the authority derive that these rebels challenge? How does rebellion start with the ideas of a few and expand to the masses? What happens when rebellion becomes fashionable? And, most important for our purposes, what is the value of persuasive rhetoric and argumentation in challenging authority?

We will consider these questions and more by surveying a broad array of arguments regarding the many forms that rebellion takes. This course will consider a variety of “rebellious” texts, including political treatises and manifestoes spanning from the English Civil War to the present; hip-hop, punk, and folk music; and visual media such as graffiti and internet memes, to name just a few. We will also explore informative secondary research critiquing and elaborating these texts’ arguments to develop a vocabulary and conceptual framework for talking about rebellion. In our analysis of rebellion, we will examine a number of important interrelated issues that arise while considering the persuasive efforts made by these texts, including the origins of authority, the relationship between a people and their government, the legitimacy of rebellion, and the conditions that generally lead to rebellion. Because this course has a writing flag, it will be writing intensive; to fulfill the requirements, students will compose and revise three longer papers (each between 5-8 pages in length, including their own persuasive call for rebellion, which will also be delivered orally), as well as write a handful of shorter assignments.

 

Assignments and Grading

  • Paper 1.1:  Advisory grade
  • Paper 1.2: 10%
  • Paper 2.1: 15%
  • Paper 2.2: 15% 
  • Paper 3.1: 15%
  • Paper 3.2: 15%
  • Short Writing Assignments: 25%
  • Presentation: 5%

Required Texts and Course Readings

  • John W. Bowers, Donovan J. Ochs, Richard J. Jensen, and David P. Schulz. The Rhetoric of Agitation and Control, Third Edition. 2009.  
  • Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker. Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers. Pearson, 2010.
  • Andrea Lunsford. Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. 

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Rebellion

86330 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ 2.122
Wr

“When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.” - The Declaration of Independence (1776) 

Although the idea of “rebellion” is often burdened with negative connotations, it occupies a place of particular fascination in American society; in our popular culture, we love underdogs, outlaws, and rule-breakers, and even America’s very inception happened through an act of defiance. From the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the mayhem caused by internet hacktivists like Anonymous, “rebellion” takes many forms, occurring when the oppressed finally says, “Enough.” What is it, though, that makes someone a rebel? And what does it mean to rebel? Must rebellion always end with violence, or can resistance be peaceable? How has rebellion changed in shape and scope over time? And from where does the authority derive that these rebels challenge? How does rebellion start with the ideas of a few and expand to the masses? What happens when rebellion becomes fashionable? And, most important for our purposes, what is the value of persuasive rhetoric and argumentation in challenging authority?

We will consider these questions and more by surveying a broad array of arguments regarding the many forms that rebellion takes. This course will consider a variety of “rebellious” texts, including political treatises and manifestoes spanning from the English Civil War to the present; hip-hop, punk, and folk music; and visual media such as graffiti and internet memes, to name just a few. We will also explore informative secondary research that critiques and elaborates these texts' arguments to develop a vocabulary and conceptual framework for talking about rebellion. In our analysis of rebellion, we will examine a number of important interrelated issues that arise while considering the persuasive efforts made by these texts, including the origins of authority, the relationship between a people and their government, the legitimacy of rebellion, and the conditions that generally lead to rebellion. Because this course has a writing flag, it will be writing intensive; to fulfill the requirements, students will compose and revise three longer papers (each between 5-8 pages in length, including their own persuasive call for rebellion, which will also be delivered orally), as well as write a handful of shorter assignments.

 Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1:  Advisory grade

Paper 1.2: 10%

Paper 2.1: 15%

Paper 2.2: 15% 

Paper 3.1: 15%

Paper 3.2: 15%

Short Writing Assignments: 25%

Presentation: 5%

 Required Texts and Course Readings

John W. Bowers, Donovan J. Ochs, Richard J. Jensen, and David P. Schulz. The Rhetoric of Agitation and Control, Third Edition. 2009.  

Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker. Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers. Pearson, 2010.

Andrea Lunsford. Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. 

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