Department of English

Alfredo Khoshnood


B.A., English, The University of Iowa

Interests


Milton, early modern poetry and poetics, monism/materialism, early modern religious poetry

Courses


E 314J • Literature And Film

34905 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 0.118
Wr

E 314J  l  1-Literature and Film

 

Instructor: Khoshnood, A

Unique #:  34905

Semester: Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course offers a grounding in the basic methods of literary study and analysis: close reading, secondary research, and contextual interpretation.  Students will develop and hone these skills by considering how the chosen course texts explore questions of empathy, shared human experience, political and personal chaos, and the perils of creativity.  As the course texts encompass a variety of genres occurring within distinct historical and cultural contexts, students will also learn how genre and form are often shaped by those contexts.

 

In this course, students will become familiar with using the Oxford English Dictionary, UT library databases, and other print and online resources for literary study.  We will also explore how different modes and theories of critical interpretation can be brought to bear on our course texts.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative texts: Films: The Third Man (dir. Carol Reed 1949), Blade Runner (dir. Ridley Scott 1982), Barton Fink (dir. Joel and Ethan Coen, 1991).  Novels: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (1818); Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness (1969). Poetry: selected short poems by John Milton, Emily Dickinson, Wilfred Owen, and W.H. Auden.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short papers, one of which must be revised and resubmitted, which will account for 70% of the final grade.  Students will also write weekly responses to the course texts on the course’s Canvas discussion board, which are worth 20% of the final grade.  Occasional quizzes and short writing assignments will account for the remaining 10% of the final grade.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Soccer

43370 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.216
Wr

“The ball turns, the world turns.”

-Eduardo Galeano, Soccer in Sun and Shadow

The globe’s most popular sport is a nexus for rhetoric: people argue about it, through it, and using it. In this course we will consider how soccer functions as a rhetorical entity. We will begin by considering the sport’s inextricable connection to the progression of globalization in the latter half of the twentieth century. We will then survery various genres of soccer related media in order to understand how the public discourse surrounding soccer reflects rhetorical trends and concepts. Through this consideration, we will come to understand how soccer functions as both an individual and collective athletic performance and as a complex cultural, political, and rhetorical spectacle. In addition to furthering our understanding of soccer’s role in global discourse, we will also develop skills in persuasive and analytic composition across various media formats.

Assignment Breakdown:

  • Moments in Soccer Timeline: 20%
  • Rhetorical Analysis First Draft: 15%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Revision: 20%
  • Soccer in the Shadows Debate: 35%
  • Viewing Journals: 5%
  • Participation: 5%

Note on participation: participation grades in this class will be determined by active engagement in class discussions and activities, and occasional reading quizzes.

Required texts:

  • They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd edition.
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook
  • Additional readings to be supplied on Canvas by instructor

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Soccer

43655 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 206
Wr

“The ball turns, the world turns.”

-Eduardo Galeano, Soccer in Sun and Shadow

The globe’s most popular sport is a nexus for rhetoric: people argue about it, through it, and using it. In this course we will consider how soccer functions as a rhetorical entity. We will begin by considering the sport’s inextricable connection to the progression of globalization in the latter half of the twentieth century. We will then survery various genres of soccer related media in order to understand how the public discourse surrounding soccer reflects rhetorical trends and concepts. Through this consideration, we will come to understand how soccer functions as both an individual and collective athletic performance and as a complex cultural, political, and rhetorical spectacle. In addition to furthering our understanding of soccer’s role in global discourse, we will also develop skills in persuasive and analytic composition across various media formats.

Assignment Breakdown:

  • Moments in Soccer Timeline: 20%
  • Rhetorical Analysis First Draft: 15%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Revision: 20%
  • Soccer in the Shadows Debate: 35%
  • Viewing Journals: 5%
  • Participation: 5%

Note on participation: participation grades in this class will be determined by active engagement in class discussions and activities, and occasional reading quizzes.

Required texts:

  • They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd edition.
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook
  • Additional readings to be supplied on Canvas by instructor

RHE F309K • Rhetoric Of Soccer

84420 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 302
Wr

“The ball turns, the world turns.”

-Eduardo Galeano, Soccer in Sun and Shadow

The globe’s most popular sport is a nexus for rhetoric: people argue about it, through it, and using it. In this course we will consider how soccer functions as a rhetorical entity. We will begin by considering the sport’s inextricable connection to the progression of globalization in the latter half of the twentieth century. We will then survery various genres of soccer related media in order to understand how the public discourse surrounding soccer reflects rhetorical trends and concepts. Through this consideration, we will come to understand how soccer functions as both an individual and collective athletic performance and as a complex cultural, political, and rhetorical spectacle. In addition to furthering our understanding of soccer’s role in global discourse, we will also develop skills in persuasive and analytic composition across various media formats.

 

Assignment Breakdown

  • Moments in Soccer Timeline: 20%
  • Rhetorical Analysis First Draft: 15%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Revision: 20%
  • Soccer in the Shadows Debate: 35%
  • Viewing Journals: 5%
  • Participation: 5%

Note on participation: participation grades in this class will be determined by active engagement in class discussions and activities, and occasional reading quizzes.

 

Required texts:

  • They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd edition.
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook
  • Additional readings to be supplied on Canvas by instructor

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