Department of English

Andrew Booth


Andrew Booth

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Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Suburbia-Wb

43630 • Spring 2021
Internet; Asynchronous
Wr

Master-planned communities, McMansions, strip malls, chain restaurants, megachurches: these are all archetypical images of American suburbia, a place where more than half of all Americans live. Yet despite their formative impression on American culture and society over the past seventy years, the suburbs are often dismissed with an eye-roll and chalked up as cookie-cutter and clichéd. But perhaps it is the everyday nature of the suburbs that makes them so important to think about critically. We’ll begin the course by asking ourselves, “How do suburban spaces shape the identity and values of an individual, of a neighborhood, or of a city?” In short, this course will treat the suburbs as texts, spaces that are rhetorically constructed and deeply rooted in ideologies of race, consumerism, and nostalgia.

 

In this course we’ll first examine representations of suburbia in film and read some critical texts that analyze American suburbs. Then, after acquainting ourselves with some rhetorical theory, principles, and terminology, we’ll examine a suburb, critically analyzing its physical spaces and places. Finally, we’ll write persuasively and put forth our own critical arguments about suburbia in the American cultural, political, and societal landscape. If everything works, examining suburbia through a rhetorical lens will allow us to develop skills that will be useful in not only understanding how suburbia has shaped American values and ideology, but it will also allow us to better engage in current critical conversations about suburbia as they relate to American society, politics, and culture.

 

Assignments:

 

  • Assignment 1: Mapping Suburbia (10%)
  • Assignment 2: Rhetorical Analysis of a Place/Space (10%)
  • Assignment 3: Rhetorical Analysis of a Suburb (15%)
  • Assignment 4.1: Proposal Argument (10%)
  • Assignment 4.2: Revision of Assignment 4.1 (15%)
  • Assignment 5: Presentation (10%)
  • Short Writing Assignments—4x (20%)
  • Participation (10%)

 

 

Required Texts:

 

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, 7th edition (without readings)

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Suburbia-Wb

42300 • Fall 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
Wr

Master-planned communities, McMansions, strip malls, chain restaurants, megachurches: these are all archetypical images of American suburbia, a place where more than half of all Americans live. Yet despite their formative impression on American culture and society over the past seventy years, the suburbs are often dismissed with an eye-roll and chalked up as cookie-cutter and clichéd. But perhaps it is the everyday nature of the suburbs that makes them so important to think about critically. We’ll begin the course by asking ourselves, “How do suburban spaces shape the identity and values of an individual, of a neighborhood, or of a city?” In short, this course will treat the suburbs as texts, spaces that are rhetorically constructed and deeply rooted in ideologies of race, consumerism, and nostalgia.

In this course we’ll first examine representations of suburbia in film and read some critical texts that analyze American suburbs. Then, after acquainting ourselves with some rhetorical theory, principles, and terminology, we’ll examine a suburb, critically analyzing its physical spaces and places. Finally, we’ll write persuasively and put forth our own critical arguments about suburbia in the American cultural, political, and societal landscape. If everything works, examining suburbia through a rhetorical lens will allow us to develop skills that will be useful in not only understanding how suburbia has shaped American values and ideology, but it will also allow us to better engage in current critical conversations about suburbia as they relate to American society, politics, and culture.

Assignments:

  • Assignment 1: Mapping Suburbia (10%)
  • Assignment 2: Rhetorical Analysis of a Place/Space (10%)
  • Assignment 3: Rhetorical Analysis of a Suburb (15%)
  • Assignment 4.1: Proposal Argument (10%)
  • Assignment 4.2: Revision of Assignment 4.1 (15%)
  • Assignment 5: Presentation (10%)
  • Short Writing Assignments—4x (20%)
  • Participation (10%)

Required Texts:

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, 7th edition (without readings)

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Suburbia-Wb

82140 • Summer 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
Wr

Master-planned communities, McMansions, strip malls, chain restaurants, megachurches: these are all archetypical images of American suburbia, a place where more than half of all Americans live. Yet despite their formative impression on American culture and society over the past seventy years, the suburbs are often dismissed with an eye-roll and chalked up as cookie-cutter and clichéd. But perhaps it is the everyday nature of the suburbs that makes them so important to think about critically. We’ll begin the course by asking ourselves, “How do suburban spaces shape the identity and values of an individual, of a neighborhood, or of a city?” In short, this course will treat the suburbs as texts, spaces that are rhetorically constructed and deeply rooted in ideologies of race, consumerism, and nostalgia.

In this course we’ll first examine representations of suburbia in film and read some critical texts that analyze American suburbs. Then, after acquainting ourselves with some rhetorical theory, principles, and terminology, we’ll examine a suburb, critically analyzing its physical spaces and places. Finally, we’ll write persuasively and put forth our own critical arguments about suburbia in the American cultural, political, and societal landscape. If everything works, examining suburbia through a rhetorical lens will allow us to develop skills that will be useful in not only understanding how suburbia has shaped American values and ideology, but it will also allow us to better engage in current critical conversations about suburbia as they relate to American society, politics, and culture.

Assignments:

  • Assignment 1: Mapping Suburbia (10%)
  • Assignment 2: Rhetorical Analysis of a Place/Space (10%)
  • Assignment 3: Rhetorical Analysis of a Suburb (15%)
  • Assignment 4.1: Proposal Argument (10%)
  • Assignment 4.2: Revision of Assignment 4.1 (15%)
  • Assignment 5: Presentation (10%)
  • Short Writing Assignments—4x (20%)
  • Participation (10%)

Required Texts:

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, 7th edition (without readings

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