Department of English

Brie Winnega


PhD Student, University of Texas at Austin

Brie Winnega

Contact

Interests


Contemporary American literature, disability studies, health humanities, life writing

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Illness-Wb

43665 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

In the midst of the recent Covid-19 outbreak this spring, one reporter from The Guardian asks, “Now [that] the WHO has declared Covid-19 a pandemic, what will it mean for the way the outbreak is treated and prepared for?” (Davey 2020). Another reporter writing for The New Yorker argues that President Trump’s March 11 speech about the “foreign virus” carried an exceptionally nationalistic tone, exemplifying his inadequate response to the disease (Glasser 2020). As many of these news reports indicate, our rhetoric often has important effects on the way our society responds to public health emergencies. In the case of a pandemic, rhetoric can impact the means through which whole governments initiate policy changes. At the individual level, it can impact how we advocate for a loved one who is sick, how we give instructions about care needs, and how we tell our own stories.

 

This course will explore some of the ways people talk about illness. Students will be asked to discuss and unpack the meaning and significance of words such as “cure,” “diagnosis,” “disease,” and “immunity.” As a class, we will engage with a variety of genres ranging from personal narratives, to healthcare pamphlets, to news reports and social media – all with an eye toward what type of rhetoric is deployed and what it is intended to accomplish.

 

Since this is a research-based and writing-intensive course, students will be asked to identify and research over the duration of the semester a topic of interest related to rhetoric of illness. They will draft and revise numerous writing assignments related to their topic, critically analyzing how rhetoric is deployed in their choice of cultural artifacts related to the course theme. Finally, they will use what they have learned to invent their own arguments around cultural constructions of illness.

 

 

Required Texts

  • Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Everything’s an Argument. 2012.
  • Style Guide from UNC Writing Center: [available online]

https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/

  • Other course content available via Canvas.

 

Assignments

  • Participation (10%)
  • Paper 1 Literature Review (15%)
  • Paper 2.1 Rhetorical Analysis (10%)
    • Paper 2.2 Revision (15%)
  • Paper 3.1 Analytical Essay (15%)
    • Project 3.2 Revision (25%)
  • Minor Writing Assignments (10%)

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Illness-Wb

42245 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

In the midst of the recent Covid-19 outbreak this spring, one reporter from The Guardian asks, “Now [that] the WHO has declared Covid-19 a pandemic, what will it mean for the way the outbreak is treated and prepared for?” (Davey 2020). Another reporter writing for The New Yorker argues that President Trump’s March 11 speech about the “foreign virus” carried an exceptionally nationalistic tone, exemplifying his inadequate response to the disease (Glasser 2020). As many of these news reports indicate, our rhetoric often has important effects on the way our society responds to public health emergencies. In the case of a pandemic, rhetoric can impact the means through which whole governments initiate policy changes. At the individual level, it can impact how we advocate for a loved one who is sick, how we give instructions about care needs, and how we tell our own stories.

This course will explore some of the ways people talk about illness. Students will be asked to discuss and unpack the meaning and significance of words such as “cure,” “diagnosis,” “disease,” and “immunity.” As a class, we will engage with a variety of genres ranging from personal narratives, to healthcare pamphlets, to news reports and social media – all with an eye toward what type of rhetoric is deployed and what it is intended to accomplish.

Since this is a research-based and writing-intensive course, students will be asked to identify and research over the duration of the semester a topic of interest related to rhetoric of illness. They will draft and revise numerous writing assignments related to their topic, critically analyzing how rhetoric is deployed in their choice of cultural artifacts related to the course theme. Finally, they will use what they have learned to invent their own arguments around cultural constructions of illness.

Required Texts

  • Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Everything’s an Argument. 2012.
  • Style Guide from UNC Writing Center: [available online]

https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/

  • Other course content available via Canvas.

Assignments

  • Participation (10%)
  • Paper 1 Literature Review (15%)
  • Paper 2.1 Rhetorical Analysis (10%)
    • Paper 2.2 Revision (15%)
  • Paper 3.1 Analytical Essay (15%)
    • Project 3.2 Revision (25%)

Minor Writing Assignments (10%)

RHE F309K • Rhetoric Of Illness-Wb

82120 • Summer 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
Wr

In the midst of the recent Covid-19 outbreak this spring, one reporter from The Guardian asks, “Now [that] the WHO has declared Covid-19 a pandemic, what will it mean for the way the outbreak is treated and prepared for?” (Davey 2020). Another reporter writing for The New Yorker argues that President Trump’s March 11 speech about the “foreign virus” carried an exceptionally nationalistic tone, exemplifying his inadequate response to the disease (Glasser 2020). As many of these news reports indicate, our rhetoric often has important effects on the way our society responds to public health emergencies. In the case of a pandemic, rhetoric can impact the means through which whole governments initiate policy changes. At the individual level, it can impact how we advocate for a loved one who is sick, how we give instructions about care needs, and how we tell our own stories.

This course will explore some of the ways people talk about illness. Students will be asked to discuss and unpack the meaning and significance of words such as “cure,” “diagnosis,” “disease,” and “immunity.” As a class, we will engage with a variety of genres ranging from personal narratives, to healthcare pamphlets, to news reports and social media – all with an eye toward what type of rhetoric is deployed and what it is intended to accomplish.

Since this is a research-based and writing-intensive course, students will be asked to identify and research over the duration of the semester a topic of interest related to rhetoric of illness. They will draft and revise numerous writing assignments related to their topic, critically analyzing how rhetoric is deployed in their choice of cultural artifacts related to the course theme. Finally, they will use what they have learned to invent their own arguments around cultural constructions of illness.

 

Required Texts

  • Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Everything’s an Argument. 2012.
  • Style Guide from UNC Writing Center: [available online]

https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/

  • Other course content available via Canvas.

Assignments

  • Participation (10%)
  • Paper 1 Literature Review (15%)
  • Paper 2.1 Rhetorical Analysis (10%)
    • Paper 2.2 Revision (15%)
  • Paper 3.1 Analytical Essay (15%)
    • Project 3.2 Revision (25%)
  • Minor Writing Assignments (10%)

Curriculum Vitae


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