Department of English

Emily Harring


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Courses


E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34915 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.212
Wr

E 314L  ●  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor:  Harring, E

Unique #:  34915

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: 

I imagine one of the reasons people cling to their hates so stubbornly is because they sense, once hate is gone, they will be forced to deal with pain.”

––James Baldwin

 

At a time when violence and injustice saturate our sociocultural environment—be it film, music, or art—books continue to be banned in classrooms and communities.  Books have been banned because of their depictions of the past (e.g., depictions of war or slavery); similarly, books have been banned for the ways they portray the present and imagine possible futures (e.g., regarding identity or desire).  In this course, we will interrogate how and why literary texts, and their authors, are sometimes considered “dangerous,” as well as their surrounding contexts.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Required Texts:  Bless Me, Ultimaby Rudolfo Anaya; Sulaby Toni Morrison; A Raisin in the Sunby Lorraine Hansbury; Other texts made available on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Close Reading Paper, (10%); Annotated Bibliography (10%); Context Paper (w/ first draft, and peer review) (20%); Argument Paper (w/ peer review, and presentation) (30%); Three creative exercises (10%); Five short response exercises (10%); Participation(w/ discussion presentation) (10%).

E 314V • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

35180 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 303
CDWr (also listed as WGS 301)

E 314V  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Harring, E

 Unique #:  35180

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  WGS 301.27

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  

 

“My silences had not protected me. Your silence will not protect you…What are the words you do not yet have? What do you need to say?”

                                                                  ––Audra Lorde

 

This course will examine the ways in which women writers of color have broken their silence and spoken their truths.  We will investigate what it means for these women to speak when others tell them they ought to be silent, and we will look writing as a political resistance.  How can we all speak our truths?  How do we break our silences to write through moments that are potentially traumatic and violent?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Possible texts include Citizen by Claudia Rankine, Beloved by Toni Morrison, and Heart Berries by Terese Marie Mailhot.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of three (3) short essays (60% of final grade), the second and third of which will be revised and resubmitted.  There will also be an Annotated Bibliography (10% of final grade) and a series of short writing assignments (20% of final grade).  Participation is a vital part of class and constitutes 10% of your final grade.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Horror

43585 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 6
Wr

Culturally, the horror genre has allowed writers and directors the opportunity to discuss real world issues in a sphere removed from our own, to make the dialogue easier to digest for consumers. Throughout the semester, we will gauge what real world issues we see reflected in the horror we read/listen to/view, in order to analyze how the issue informs the argument being made. This course invites you to explore the language of horror. It asks: what rhetorical strategies does the author (or director) choose in order to achieve their horrific moments? What arguments are made in popular horror cinema or literature, and how are those arguments being made? In this class, you will learn how to rhetorically analyze arguments—specifically those tied to the horrific. We will trace the rhetoric of horror from medieval literature to contemporary horror films—stopping along the way to meet the Anglo-Saxon monster Grendel, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, Charles Baudelaire, and Edgar Allen Poe; we will listen to the broadcast that terrified the masses in 1938, and watch as a young woman finds herself accused of witchcraft in Robert Eggers’s The Witch. As we trace horror, we will ask ourselves which issues seem most important to the writers or directors; what are they arguing against or towards?

 

Textbooks

 

• Everything’s an Argument. 7 th Edition w/o readings

• The Little Longhorn Handbook. Norton, 2014.

• Let the Right One In

• The Witch

• Other readings available on course website.

 

Assignments and Grades

The assignments are as follows: Synthesis Essay Rhetorical Review (2.1) Rhetorical Review Revision (2.2) Creative Rhetorical Essay (3.1) Creative Rhetorical Essay Revision (3.2) Final Project Short Writing Assignments.

In this class, “traditional” grades will not be given for assignments; rather, I am employing the Learning Record. Students will be asked to demonstrate to the instructor that that have developed across the six dimensions of learning throughout the entirety of the course.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Horror

44020 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 9
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Horror

Culturally, the horror genre has allowed writers and directors the opportunity to discuss real world issues in a sphere removed from our own, to make the dialogue easier to digest for consumers. Throughout the semester, we will gauge what real world issues we see reflected in the horror we read/listen to/view, in order to analyze how the issue informs the argument being made. This course invites you to explore the language of horror. It asks: what rhetorical strategies does the author (or director) choose in order to achieve their horrific moments? What arguments are made in popular horror cinema or literature, and how are those arguments being made? In this class, you will learn how to rhetorically analyze arguments—specifically those tied to the horrific. We will trace the rhetoric of horror from medieval literature to contemporary horror films—stopping along the way to meet the Anglo-Saxon monster Grendel, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, Charles Baudelaire, and Edgar Allen Poe; we will listen to the broadcast that terrified the masses in 1938, and watch as a young woman finds herself accused of witchcraft in Robert Eggers’s The Witch. As we trace horror, we will ask ourselves which issues seem most important to the writers or directors; what are they arguing against or towards?

 

Textbooks

 

• Everything’s an Argument. 7 th Edition w/o readings

• The Little Longhorn Handbook. Norton, 2014.

• Let the Right One In

• The Witch

• Other readings available on course website.

 

Assignments and Grades

The assignments are as follows: Synthesis Essay Rhetorical Review (2.1) Rhetorical Review Revision (2.2) Creative Rhetorical Essay (3.1) Creative Rhetorical Essay Revision (3.2) Final Project Short Writing Assignments.

In this class, “traditional” grades will not be given for assignments; rather, I am employing the Learning Record. Students will be asked to demonstrate to the instructor that that have developed across the six dimensions of learning throughout the entirety of the course.

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84925 • Summer 2017
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 2.122
C1

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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