Department of English

Liz Fischer


Liz Fischer

Contact

Courses


E 314L • The Pulitzer Prize

35129 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 204
Wr

E 314L  l  8-The Pulitzer Prize

Instructor:  Fischer, L

Unique:  35129

Semester:  Spring 2022

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

Description:  Since its introduction in 1917, The Pulitzer Prize has become one of the primary markers of success in American journalism, literature, and music.  In this class, we will read (and watch, and listen to) some of the winners over the last half-century and consider what constitutes award-worthy “excellence” in literature.  In what ways are, or aren’t, these works responding to their cultural moment?  What does it mean for a text to reflect “American life,” and what versions of that life are awarded?  Who gets to decide the winners, how, and why do we bother?

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course carries a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

Possible texts may include:  Eudora Welty, The Optimist’s Daughter; Michael Cunningham, The Hours; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Frank Bidart, Half Light (selections); Wallace Stevens, The Collected Poems (selections); Michael R. Jackson, A Strange Loop (libretto & recording).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be three major papers (totalling around 75% of the final grade), at least one of which will be revised and resubmitted.  The remaining work of the course will include a reading journal, in-class activities, and benchmark assignments on the way to larger papers.

E 314L • The Pulitzer Prize

35895 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 304
Wr

E 314L  |  8-The Pulitzer Prize

Instructor:  Fischer, L

Unique #:  35895

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

Description:  Since its introduction in 1917, The Pulitzer Prize has beome one of the primary markers of success in American journalism, literature, and music.  In this class, we will read (and watch, and listen to) some of the winners over the last half-century and consider what constitutes award-worthy “excellence” in literature.  In what ways are, or aren’t, these works responding to their cultural moment?  What does it mean for a text to reflect “American life,” and what versions of that life are awarded?  Who gets to decide the winners, how, and why do we bother?

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course carries a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Reading List:  Eudora Welty, The Optimist’s Daughter; Michael Cunningham, The Hours; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Frank Bidart, Star Dust; Michael R. Jackson, A Strange Loop (recording).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be three major papers (totalling around 75% of the final grade), at least one of which will be revised and resubmitted.  The remaining work of the course will include a reading journal, in-class activities, and benchmark assignments on the way to larger papers.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The Outlaw-Wb

43645 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

In this course, we will explore topics in rhetoric through representations of the “outlaw” in literature, film, and popular culture, as well as in public discourse and politics. We will be reading excerpts from critical and literary texts, watching clips of films and considering the American fascination with the rebel, the criminal, the deviant. We will pay particular attention to how representations of the outlaw make arguments about acceptable relationships of individuals to society and about who can exercise power. How do different archetypes of the outlaw—such as social bandits, rebels, and—relate to each other? How do the rhetoric they use and the rhetoric used to talk about them differ? How do “outsider” perspectives gather and create authority? 

Grading breakdown:

  • Short Writing and Blog Posts: 25%
  • Defining “Outlaw” Essay: 15%
  • Rhetorical Analysis: 15%
  • Final essay first draft: 15%
  • Final essay revision: 20%
  • Participation: 10%
    • In-class exercises: 5%
    • Peer Review: 5%

Required texts:

  • Everything’s an Argument (8th edition) by Andrea Lunsford, John Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters
  • The Outlaw Bible of American Literature by Alan Kaufman, Barney Rosset
  • Purdue OWL as a writing handbook

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The Outlaw-Wb

42310 • Fall 2020
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

In this course, we will explore topics in rhetoric through representations of the “outlaw” in literature, film, and popular culture, as well as in public discourse and politics. We will be reading excerpts from critical and literary texts, watching clips of films and considering the American fascination with the rebel, the criminal, the deviant. We will pay particular attention to how representations of the outlaw make arguments about acceptable relationships of individuals to society and about who can exercise power. How do different archetypes of the outlaw—such as social bandits, rebels, and—relate to each other? How do the rhetoric they use and the rhetoric used to talk about them differ? How do “outsider” perspectives gather and create authority? 

Grading breakdown:

  • Short Writing and Blog Posts: 25%
  • Defining “Outlaw” Essay: 15%
  • Rhetorical Analysis: 15%
  • Final essay first draft: 15%
  • Final essay revision: 20%
  • Participation: 10%
    • In-class exercises: 5%
    • Peer Review: 5%

Required texts:

  • Everything’s an Argument (8th edition) by Andrea Lunsford, John Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters
  • The Outlaw Bible of American Literature by Alan Kaufman, Barney Rosset

Purdue OWL as a writing handbook

AMS 315 • Intro To Digital Humanities

31099 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 7
Wr

Please check back for updates.

Profile Pages


External Links