Department of English

Gabriella Rodriguez


Contact

Interests


Caribbean Literature, African Diaspora Studies

Biography


Gabriella Rodriguez is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). She earned a Master's degree in English from UT, and her Bachelor's degree from the University of Houston. Her dissertation, The Presence of Past: Experimental Modes of Representation in Neoslave Narratives focuses on the literary strategies contemporary Caribbean authors utilize to imagine the experiences of enslaved human beings. While at UT Austin, she has served as Editor for the Ethnic and Third World Literatures (E3W) Review of Books (2017-2018) and as organizer of the 18th Annual Sequels Symposium. She is currently serving as as Assistant Program Coordinator at the University Writing Center. 

Courses


E 314J • Literature And Film

34905 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.118
Wr

E 314J  l  1-Literature and Film

 

Instructor:  Rodriguez, G

Unique #:  34905

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Focusing on texts produced in the 20th century and beyond, this course allows students to learn methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of world literature and film.  Students in this course will gain familiarity with important texts produced in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Pacific Islands.  In addition, students will examine the relationships between texts and assess how each work constructs and/or deconstructs cultural identities.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Death in Venice(Mann 1918), Nervous Conditions (Dangarembga 1988), The Battle of Algiers(dir. Pontecorvo 1966), Princess Mononoke (dir. Miyazaki 1997),Boy(dir. Waititi 2010)

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which can be revised and resubmitted (80% of the final grade).  Other graded material may include: short reaction papers, student in-class presentations, and quizzes (20% of the final grade).

E 314J • Literature And Film

35075 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 5.190
Wr

E 314J  l  1-Literature and Film

 

Instructor:  Rodriguez, G

Unique #:  35075

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Focusing on texts produced in the 20th century and beyond, this course allows students to learn methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of world literature and film.  Students in this course will gain familiarity with important texts produced in Africa, Europe, Latin America and the Pacific Islands.  In addition, students will examine the relationships between texts and assess how each work constructs and/or deconstructs cultural identities.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Dubliners (Joyce 1914), Death in Venice (Mann 1918), The White Ribbon (dir. Haneke 2009), The Battle of Algiers (dir. Pontecorvo 1966), Boy (dir. Waititi 2010), The Second Mother (dir. Muylaert 2015)

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which can be revised and resubmitted (80% of the final grade).  Other graded material may include: short reaction papers, student in-class presentations, and quizzes (20% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Tourism

43655 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 9
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Tourism

Travel to Jamaica where you can “be alright,” go to Tahiti and “escape to a place untouched by time” or journey to nearby Bali to experience the “sublimely sacred.” Tourism slogans like these intuit a deep desire in all of us by hinting that beyond the banality of daily life exists a place that can fundamentally alter us. Each slogan creates its own version paradise: an ideal of a location steeped in history or nostalgia, characterized as sophisticated, wild, or sublime.

Examining poetry, novels, travelogues, magazine ads, postcards, posters, brochures, popular songs, paintings, illustrations, and more we will ask ourselves how the rhetoric of tourism shapes our understanding of destinations, histories, and cultures. Throughout the semester, we will explore the motivations, expectations, and experiences of many politically charged subject positions: tourist, local/native, outsider/insider and colonizer/colonized. We will also examine how visual and written texts entice us to visit a place by creating some version of paradise. Your task will be to analyze texts using rhetorical theory as outlined in the course textbook as well as some recent critical theory before selecting a relevant controversy for individual research and analysis. Possible controversies will ask questions about how the rhetoric of tourism is related to the economic, political, cultural, social, and environmental impacts of traveling. Using your chosen controversy as a platform, you will practice rhetorical analysis of multimedia texts that you will research and select. In your final project you will explore the rhetoric of paradise by creating a cultural object that engages with, relies on or rejects these rhetorics. Ultimately, you will choose a target audience and will advocate a position regarding the cultural, economic, political, and environmental impacts of travel and tourism today. In considering your position and the way arguments about tourism are formed in our course texts and media, we will work to cultivate ourselves as global citizens and academic writers.

Coursework & Grading

UNIT 1

  • Annotated Bibliography          15%
  • In-Class Presentations                        10%

UNIT 2

  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay       20%
  • Research Summaries (2)         15%

UNIT 3

  • Cultural Object Proposal        15%    
  • Cultural Object Analysis         25%

Textbooks

  • Lunsford, Andrea A. – Easy Writer
  • Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz – Everything’s an Argument 

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Tourism

44105 • Fall 2017
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 7
Wr

RHE 309K: Rhetoric of Tourism

Travel to Jamaica where you can “be alright,” go to Tahiti and “escape to a place untouched by time” or journey to nearby Bali to experience the “sublimely sacred.” Tourism slogans like these intuit a deep desire in all of us by hinting that beyond the banality of daily life exists a place that can fundamentally alter us. Each slogan creates its own version paradise: an ideal of a location steeped in history or nostalgia, characterized as sophisticated, wild, or sublime.

Examining poetry, novels, travelogues, magazine ads, postcards, posters, brochures, popular songs, paintings, illustrations, and more we will ask ourselves how the rhetoric of tourism shapes our understanding of destinations, histories, and cultures. Throughout the semester, we will explore the motivations, expectations, and experiences of many politically charged subject positions: tourist, local/native, outsider/insider and colonizer/colonized. We will also examine how visual and written texts entice us to visit a place by creating some version of paradise. Your task will be to analyze texts using rhetorical theory as outlined in the course textbook as well as some recent critical theory before selecting a relevant controversy for individual research and analysis. Possible controversies will ask questions about how the rhetoric of tourism is related to the economic, political, cultural, social, and environmental impacts of traveling. Using your chosen controversy as a platform, you will practice rhetorical analysis of multimedia texts that you will research and select. In your final project you will explore the rhetoric of paradise by creating a cultural object that engages with, relies on or rejects these rhetorics. Ultimately, you will choose a target audience and will advocate a position regarding the cultural, economic, political, and environmental impacts of travel and tourism today. In considering your position and the way arguments about tourism are formed in our course texts and media, we will work to cultivate ourselves as global citizens and academic writers.

Coursework & Grading

UNIT 1

  • Annotated Bibliography          15%
  • In-Class Presentations                        10%

UNIT 2

  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay       20%
  • Research Summaries (2)         15%

UNIT 3

  • Cultural Object Proposal        15%    
  • Cultural Object Analysis         25%

Textbooks

  • Lunsford, Andrea A. – Easy Writer
  • Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz – Everything’s an Argument 

RHE 306 • Rhetoric And Writing

43885 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ 1.208
C1

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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