Department of English

Haley Eazor


Haley Eazor

Contact

Interests


20th and 21st century poetry and poetics, contemporary literature and culture, environmental criticism, ecopoetics, multi-ethnic feminist theory, and critical race theory.

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The Female Villain

43810 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 206
Wr

I’ve grown quite weary of the spunky heroines...soul-searching fashionistas that stock so many books. I particularly mourn the lack of female villains — good, potent female villains. Not ill-tempered women who scheme about landing good men and better shoes...I’m talking violent, wicked women. Scary women. Don’t tell me you don’t know some.” ― Gillian Flynn

 

What constitutes a “villainous” woman? How does one become designated as such? From iconic Disney villains such as Cruella de Vil to more ambiguous anti-heroes such as Fleabag, how do we understand a woman’s rage? This course will explore various fictional portrayals of “evil” women and the movements, spaces, and moments that give rise to them. We will examine the rhetoric surrounding the villain by considering the ethos of the female villain, the exigence(s) that enacted their villainy, and the audience reactions and ripples they leave in their wake. In this course, we will be thinking critically about how the role of the female villain has evolved over time to match contemporary ideologies, and how certain gendered tropes (the “crazy,” the “nagging shrew”) and binaries (young/old, innocent/promiscuous, good/evil) reflect and respond to current events and ethical concerns. We will begin by defining the “classic” female villain, mapping the rhetorical moves of the character through visual and literary texts as well as in popular culture. We will then work together to contextualize them: how do historical and social contexts complicate the criteria for what makes a woman villainous? What are these women responding to, or critiquing, and how? What do they forgo, invent or fight, and why? How does gender influence our understanding of both their perceived evil and agency? In class, we will explore critical questions about how gender, race, class, and society create the conditions for tropes of female villainy, ultimately moving towards alternative ways of understanding, defining, and conceiving of “scary women.”

 

Assignments and Grading

Weekly Blog Posts (15%)

Presentation (15%)

Annotated Bibliography (15%)

Rhetorical Analysis (20%)

Rhetorical Analysis Revision (15%)

Final Creative Project and Reflection (20%)

 

Texts

Glenn, Cheryl. The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing, 4th edition. Cengage, 2021.

All other materials will be provided on Canvas by the instructor. In addition, students will be required to screen a handful of films and television episodes as part of the course materials.

RHE F309K • Rhe Of The Female Villain-Wb

83160 • Summer 2021
Internet; Asynchronous
Wr

I’ve grown quite weary of the spunky heroines...soul-searching fashionistas that stock so many books. I particularly mourn the lack of female villains — good, potent female villains. Not ill-tempered women who scheme about landing good men and better shoes...I’m talking violent, wicked women. Scary women. Don’t tell me you don’t know some.” ― Gillian Flynn

 

What constitutes a “villainous” woman? How does one become designated as such? From iconic Disney villains such as Cruella de Vil to more ambiguous anti-heroes such as Fleabag, how do we understand a woman’s rage? This course will explore various fictional portrayals of “evil” women and the movements, spaces, and moments that give rise to them. We will examine the rhetoric surrounding the villain by considering the ethos of the female villain, the exigence(s) that enacted their villainy, and the audience reactions and ripples they leave in their wake. In this course, we will be thinking critically about how the role of the female villain has evolved over time to match contemporary ideologies, and how certain gendered tropes (the “crazy,” the “nagging shrew”) and binaries (young/old, innocent/promiscuous, good/evil) reflect and respond to current events and ethical concerns. We will begin by defining the “classic” female villain, mapping the rhetorical moves of the character through visual and literary texts as well as in popular culture. We will then work together to contextualize them: how do historical and social contexts complicate the criteria for what makes a woman villainous? What are these women responding to, or critiquing, and how? What do they forgo, invent or fight, and why? How does gender influence our understanding of both their perceived evil and agency? In class, we will explore critical questions about how gender, race, class, and society create the conditions for tropes of female villainy, ultimately moving towards alternative ways of understanding, defining, and conceiving of “scary women.”

 

Assignments and Grading

Weekly Blog Posts (15%)

Presentation (15%)

Annotated Bibliography (15%)

Rhetorical Analysis (20%)

Rhetorical Analysis Revision (15%)

Final Creative Project and Reflection (20%)

 

Texts

Glenn, Cheryl. The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing, 4th edition. Cengage, 2021.

All other materials will be provided on Canvas by the instructor. In addition, students will be required to screen a handful of films and television episodes as part of the course materials.

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