Department of English

Ian Ferris


Contact

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhe Of Environmental Action-Wb

43670 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

Environmental issues are all around us. Quite literally, we are environed (ie surrounded) by issues of climate change, air and water pollution, energy transition, commercial agriculture—the list goes on. One of the incredibly valuable ways that we might begin engaging with these issues is to research what experts in various fields are saying and how. At the same time, we can turn our attention not only outward to our surroundings and the voices of others, but also toward our own positions within and connections to such issues in the environments that we inhabit. This movement between exploring our environments, voices in conversation around key issues, and our own current and potential roles within those issues provides an entryway into a fundamental concept in this course: how to attune to and act as writers in increasingly fraught environments.

Being a rhetoric course, our focus is first and foremost to use environmental action as a lens through which we can study and develop our rhetorical capacities—our abilities to both strategically decode and design arguments and other forms of persuasion. But conversely, we will also use rhetoric as a series of lenses to better understand and cultivate our capacities for environmental action. Each member of the class will have the opportunity to develop a research profile on a locally-pressing environmental issue of their choice, conduct primary research through fieldwork to more deeply immerse themselves in the issue as a researcher and writer, and then compose and publish a digital argument on their chosen issue meant to move a real audience toward a form of environmental action. Questions that we will ask along the way will include: What are the historical and local contexts of these global issues? Who are the stakeholders that play a part in and are affected by them? How are others taking up environmental causes through their writing, and what can we learn from them? How does researching and writing about these issues transform our own connections to our environments? And how can we as writers meaningfully engage with local environmental issues? This course will challenge us to take our writing practice beyond the classroom, looking to our local environments not only through secondary research but through primary research that locates us literally and figuratively “in the field.”

Assignments

Major (50%): Environmental Issue Profile (15%), Field Report (15%), Digital Argument (20%)

Minor (50%): Short Rhetorical Analyses (10%), Progressive Annotated Bibliography (10%), Writers’ Profiles, Conferences, and Peer Reviews (10%), Reading Responses (10%) Fieldwork Practice (5%), Digital Argument Prospectus (5%)

Required Texts

Required Textbook: Becoming Rhetorical – Jodie Nicotra

Handbook (Free, Online): UNC Chapel Hill Writing Center Resources

RHE 309K • Rhe Of Environmental Action-Wb

42285 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

Environmental issues are all around us. Quite literally, we are environed (ie surrounded) by issues of climate change, air and water pollution, energy transition, commercial agriculture—the list goes on. One of the incredibly valuable ways that we might begin engaging with these issues is to research what experts in various fields are saying and how. At the same time, we can turn our attention not only outward to our surroundings and the voices of others, but also toward our own positions within and connections to such issues in the environments that we inhabit. This movement between exploring our environments, voices in conversation around key issues, and our own current and potential roles within those issues provides an entryway into a fundamental concept in this course: how to attune to and act as writers in increasingly fraught environments.

Being a rhetoric course, our focus is first and foremost to use environmental action as a lens through which we can study and develop our rhetorical capacities—our abilities to both strategically decode and design arguments and other forms of persuasion. But conversely, we will also use rhetoric as a series of lenses to better understand and cultivate our capacities for environmental action. Each member of the class will have the opportunity to develop a research profile on a locally-pressing environmental issue of their choice, conduct primary research through fieldwork to more deeply immerse themselves in the issue as a researcher and writer, and then compose and publish a digital argument on their chosen issue meant to move a real audience toward a form of environmental action. Questions that we will ask along the way will include: What are the historical and local contexts of these global issues? Who are the stakeholders that play a part in and are affected by them? How are others taking up environmental causes through their writing, and what can we learn from them? How does researching and writing about these issues transform our own connections to our environments? And how can we as writers meaningfully engage with local environmental issues? This course will challenge us to take our writing practice beyond the classroom, looking to our local environments not only through secondary research but through primary research that locates us literally and figuratively “in the field.”

Assignments

  • Major (50%): Environmental Issue Profile (15%), Field Report (15%), Digital Argument (20%)
  • Minor (50%): Short Rhetorical Analyses (10%), Progressive Annotated Bibliography (10%), Writers’ Profiles, Conferences, and Peer Reviews (10%), Reading Responses (10%) Fieldwork Practice (5%), Digital Argument Prospectus (5%)

Required Texts

  • Required Textbook: Becoming Rhetorical – Jodie Nicotra
  • Handbook (Free, Online): UNC Chapel Hill Writing Center Resources

RHE F306 • Rhetoric And Writing-Wb

82110 • Summer 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
C1

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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