Department of English

Jennifer (Gray) Hemstreet


M.A., University of Texas at Austin

PhD Student

Contact

Biography


 Gray Hemstreet is a Ph.D. student in the English Department at UT, specializing in British literature of the Restoration and the Long Eighteenth Century. Her primary interest is in classical reception, with a focus on classical and neoclassical tropes of literary self-eternization. She holds two B.A. degrees (English Literature and Philosophy) from Arizona State University, and an M.A. (English Literature) from the University of Texas at Austin.

Courses


E 314L • Cult Classics

34340 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 1.108
Wr

E 314L  l  9-Cult Classics

 

Instructor:  Hemstreet, J

Unique #:  34340

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  From vampires and zombies to dark magic and demonic possessions, the tropes of macabre fiction appear everywhere today, in books, shows, movies, music, and art of all kinds.  What is it that attracts us to these stories and images?  Can they teach us something about the culture we live in, our beliefs, our fears, or the way we experience the world?  With such questions in mind, our class will read a number of dark tales and poems from the last two centuries, reflecting on their ethical and aesthetic implications, and examining literary structures and techniques that have helped to define genres such as “horror,” the “gothic,” the “paranormal,” and the “weird.”

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Frankenstein (Mary Shelley), “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Edgar Allan Poe), At the Mountains of Madness (H. P. Lovecraft)

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  Students will also be expected to complete short weekly assignments in the form of quizzes, worksheets, and/or reading responses (30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Goodreads

34806 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 308
Wr

E 314L  l  10-GoodReads

TENTATIVE

Instructor:  Hemstreet, J (Gray)

Unique #:  34806

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

 

Description:  From vampires and zombies to dark magic and demonic possessions, the tropes of macabre fiction appear everywhere today, in books, shows, movies, music, and art of all kinds.  What is it that attracts us to these stories and images?  Can they teach us something about the culture we live in, our beliefs, our fears, or the way we experience the world?  With such questions in mind, our class will read a number of dark tales and poems from the last two centuries, reflecting on their ethical and aesthetic implications, and examining literary structures and techniques that have helped to define genres such as “horror,” the “gothic,” the “paranormal,” and the “weird.”

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Frankenstein (Shelley), “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Poe), “The Body Snatchers” (Stevenson).

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  Students will also be expected to complete short weekly assignments in the form of quizzes, worksheets, and/or reading responses (30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Goodreads

33895 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM SZB 422
Wr

E 314L  l  10-GoodReads

Instructor:  Hemstreet, J (Gray)

Unique #:  33895

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: From vampires and zombies to dark magic and demonic possessions, the tropes of macabre fiction appear everywhere today, in books, shows, movies, music, and art of all kinds.  What is it that attracts us to these stories and images?  Can they teach us something about the culture we live in, our beliefs, our fears, or the way we experience the world?  With such questions in mind, our class will read a number of dark tales and poems from the last two centuries, reflecting on their ethical and aesthetic implications, and examining literary structures and techniques that have helped to define genres such as “horror,” the “gothic,” the “paranormal,” and the “weird.”

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: “The Fall of the House of Usher” (Poe), “Rappaccini's Daughter” (Hawthorne), “The Call of Cthulhu” (Lovecraft), Dracula (Stoker).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  Students will also be expected to complete short weekly assignments in the form of worksheets and/or reading responses (30% of the final grade).

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