Department of English

Jane Fleming


B.A., English, University of Texas at El Paso

Ph.D. Student

Contact

Interests


Nineteenth Century American Realism and Regionalism

Biography


Jane Fleming is an Assistant Instructor and Ph.D. Student at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of two collections of creative nonfiction, Violence/Joy/Chaos (Rhythm & Bones Press, 2020) and Speak, Arroyos (Chaleur Press, 2020) and one collection of poetry, Ocotillo Worship (Apep Publications, 2019). Her poetry, prose, and visual art has also recently appeared in several journals, including Glass and Entropy. Her research focuses on late nineteenth century American Realism and Regionalism. She was also named the 2018 Outstanding Teaching Assistant in the Department of English. 

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Horror-Wb

43660 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

For over a century, American audiences have been captivated by the terrifying, horrifying, and taboo in film. This class will investigate what makes the horror genre such a mainstay in American film. It will also ask in what ways horror films respond to cultural events and anxieties. What kinds of rhetorical tools and appeals do horror films use to shape or respond to public discourse? How and why do horror movies craft their arguments about American life and culture? For instance, how does Jordan Peele’s Get Out (2017) shape its commentary on the insidiousness of white liberalism? How are film makers like John Carpenter responding to and creating arguments about the excesses of 80’s culture in cornerstone slasher films like Halloween (1978)? Why did/do these arguments continue to resonate with audiences today? In addition to placing horror films in their historical and cultural context, we will analyze horror film rhetoric through a variety of lenses, such as issues of race, gender, and disability. Students will learn to respond to horror films through rhetorical analysis and film criticism. Ultimately, we will seek to answer the question: what makes the horror genre truly horrifying?

The course will be split into four distinct units focusing on the History of Horror, Gender and Horror, Race and Horror, and Body Horror. In each unit, students will be asked to watch and respond to at least three classic horror films. Each unit will be punctuated with either a short or longform writing assignment. Students will learn to think critically and independently and conduct thoughtful, responsible research using a variety of databases, web resources, and topic-specific resources. Additionally, students will be asked to think of film as rhetorical, place film in context, respond to and analyze rhetorical maneuvers in film, compose lengthy, college-level papers and/or multimodal assignments that convey original arguments and analysis, revise ideas and compositions in response to constructive feedback from the instructor and peers, correctly document use of research materials using MLA citation, and present ideas effectively and convincingly in front of peers. An important note: Due to the content of the films we will be analyzing, this course will address a number of potentially triggering topics.

 

Assessment Breakdown

 

 

Movie Review- 10%

Rhetorical Analysis 2.1- 5%

Rhetorical Analysis 2.2- 10%

Rhetorical Analysis 3.1- 5%

Rhetorical Analysis 3.2- 10%

Final Project- 25%

Peer Review- 10%

Weekly Discussion Posts- 15% 

Participation- 10%

 

 

Course Reading List 

  1. Becoming Rhetorical: Analyzing and Composing in a Multimedia World by Jodie Nicotra
  2. 2. The remainder of readings will be available for download from the class’s secure Canvas site, through the UT Library, or on a variety of movie streaming services.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Horror-Wb

42240 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

For over a century, American audiences have been captivated by the terrifying, horrifying, and taboo in film. This class will investigate what makes the horror genre such a mainstay in American film. It will also ask in what ways horror films respond to cultural events and anxieties. What kinds of rhetorical tools and appeals do horror films use to shape or respond to public discourse? How and why do horror movies craft their arguments about American life and culture? For instance, how does Jordan Peele’s Get Out (2017) shape its commentary on the insidiousness of white liberalism? How are film makers like John Carpenter responding to and creating arguments about the excesses of 80’s culture in cornerstone slasher films like Halloween (1978)? Why did/do these arguments continue to resonate with audiences today? In addition to placing horror films in their historical and cultural context, we will analyze horror film rhetoric through a variety of lenses, such as issues of race, gender, and disability. Students will learn to respond to horror films through rhetorical analysis and film criticism. Ultimately, we will seek to answer the question: what makes the horror genre truly horrifying?

The course will be split into four distinct units focusing on the History of Horror, Gender and Horror, Race and Horror, and Body Horror. In each unit, students will be asked to watch and respond to at least three classic horror films. Each unit will be punctuated with either a short or longform writing assignment. Students will learn to think critically and independently and conduct thoughtful, responsible research using a variety of databases, web resources, and topic-specific resources. Additionally, students will be asked to think of film as rhetorical, place film in context, respond to and analyze rhetorical maneuvers in film, compose lengthy, college-level papers and/or multimodal assignments that convey original arguments and analysis, revise ideas and compositions in response to constructive feedback from the instructor and peers, correctly document use of research materials using MLA citation, and present ideas effectively and convincingly in front of peers. An important note: Due to the content of the films we will be analyzing, this course will address a number of potentially triggering topics.

Assesment Breakdown

  • Movie Review- 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis 2.1- 5%
  • Rhetorical Analysis 2.2- 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis 3.1- 5%
  • Rhetorical Analysis 3.2- 10%
  • Final Project- 25%
  • Peer Review- 10%
  • Weekly Discussion Posts- 15% 
  • Participation- 10%

Texts

  • Becoming Rhetorical: Analyzing and Composing in a Multimedia World by Jodie Nicotra
  • The remainder of readings will be available for download from the class’s secure Canvas site, through the UT Library, or on a variety of movie streaming services.

Curriculum Vitae


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