Department of English

Kirsten Hall


Contact

Interests


18th century literature, the novel, Sterne, Austen, Richardson

Courses


E 314L • Goodreads

34960 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304
Wr

E 314L l  10-GoodReads

 

Instructor:  Hall, K

Unique #:  34960

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: 

“They went to the sands, to watch the flowing of the tide, which a fine south-easterly breeze was bringing in with all the grandeur which so flat a shore admitted.  They praised the morning; gloried in the sea; sympathized in the delight of the fresh-feeling breeze — and were silent…”

                                                                                    —Jane Austen, Persuasion

 

From the glittering beaches of the French Riviera to the desolate lake of a forgotten town in Idaho, the authors in this course are drawn towards water, inspired to write about subjects as diverse as family, loss, beauty, the sublimity of nature, memory, and the hope of transformation and transcendence.  How do these authors use language to contemplate and delight in these subjects?  On the other hand, what are the limits of words?  How do these writers explore the possibilities of silence, knowing when language falls short and some things are better left unspoken?  More than escapist beach reads, these texts ask us what it is about literature, like the sea itself, that brings us together and rewards our efforts to look closely, think and write about what we find, and share those fruits with each other.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse; Jane Austen’s Persuasion; Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping; F. Scott Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea; other readings available on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  There will also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and required in-class participation (25% of the final grade).

E 314L • Goodreads

34425 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.216
Wr

E 314L l  10-GoodReads

 

Instructor:  Hall, K

Unique #:  34425

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: 

“They went to the sands, to watch the flowing of the tide, which a fine south-easterly breeze was bringing in with all the grandeur which so flat a shore admitted.  They praised the morning; gloried in the sea; sympathized in the delight of the fresh-feeling breeze — and were silent…”

                                                                                    —Jane Austen, Persuasion

 

From the glittering beaches of the French Riviera to the desolate lake of a forgotten town in Idaho, the authors in this course are drawn towards water, inspired to write about subjects as diverse as family, loss, beauty, the sublimity of nature, memory, and the hope of transformation and transcendence.  How do these authors use language to contemplate and delight in these subjects?  On the other hand, what are the limits of words?  How do these writers explore the possibilities of silence, knowing when language falls short and some things are better left unspoken?  More than escapist beach reads, these texts ask us what it is about literature, like the sea itself, that brings us together and rewards our efforts to look closely, think and write about what we find, and share those fruits with each other. 

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse; Jane Austen’s Persuasion; Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping; F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night; other readings available on Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  There will also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and required in-class participation (25% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The Dinosaur

43320 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A209A
Wr

The last of the dinosaurs went extinct about 65 million years ago. Yet, these vanished, forgotten creatures somehow still persist in our imaginations as the ultimate case of obsolescence. Is our obsession with obsolete things caused by nostalgia? Or are they a reminder of our own mortality? Perhaps it’s that the process of extinction or the reality of falling of fashion, even if it is something as small as replacing our old phones with a newer model or taking our trash to the curb, strikes to the heart of life’s basic cycle of birth, death, and resurrection. This course will examine the phenomenon of “going the way of the dinosaur,” exploring what it means for things, ideas, people, and places to become obsolete. Junk and castoffs has taken a central place in the modern world and in the modern imagination. Ever since the Industrial Revolution, we have lived in an increasingly disposable world. Songs like Macklemore’s “Thrift Shop” and shows like Pawn Stars and Antiques Road Show suggest that this state of affairs fascinates us—even approaching to religious reverence as Austin’s “Cathedral of Junk” attests. After all, one person’s trash is another’s treasure. But the fad for “KonMari” philosophies of minimalism and decluttering as well as our culture’s increasing consciousness about landfills and recycling suggests we have reason to fear.

This class will explore how authors and texts draw attention to and find meaning in forgotten, obsolete things. We will begin the semester by constructing a definition of obsolescence, learning more generally about how to understand a complex idea and apprehend its shape, dimensions and limits. Students will then turn their attention to the world around them, analyzing how what we discard and what we reuse tells us about our own shifting values and desires. Finally, in an argumentative paper and digital project, students will consider how the treasures of today become the fossils of tomorrow.     

 

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:

  • 1.1 Definitional Paper (10%)
  • 2.1 Rhetorical Analysis (10%)
  • 2.2 Rhetorical Analysis Revision (15%)
  • 3.1 Argumentative Essay (15%)
  • 3.2 Argumentative Essay Revision (15%)
  • 4.1 Digital Archive (10%)
  • Oral Presentations (5%)
  • Short Papers (10%)
  • Participation (10%)
  • Peer Reviews (Mandatory)

 

COURSE READINGS

Required Textbooks and Handbooks

  • Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook. Norton, 2014.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The Dinosaur

43710 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM JES A215A
Wr

The last of the dinosaurs went extinct about 65 million years ago. Yet, these vanished, forgotten creatures somehow still persist in our imaginations as the ultimate case of obsolescence. Is our obsession with obsolete things caused by nostalgia? Or are they a reminder of our own mortality? Perhaps it’s that the process of extinction or the reality of falling of fashion, even if it is something as small as replacing our old phones with a newer model or taking our trash to the curb, strikes to the heart of life’s basic cycle of birth, death, and resurrection. This course will examine the phenomenon of “going the way of the dinosaur,” exploring what it means for things, ideas, people, and places to become obsolete. Junk and castoffs has taken a central place in the modern world and in the modern imagination. Ever since the Industrial Revolution, we have lived in an increasingly disposable world. Songs like Macklemore’s “Thrift Shop” and shows like Pawn Stars and Antiques Road Show suggest that this state of affairs fascinates us—even approaching to religious reverence as Austin’s “Cathedral of Junk” attests. After all, one person’s trash is another’s treasure. But the fad for “KonMari” philosophies of minimalism and decluttering as well as our culture’s increasing consciousness about landfills and recycling suggests we have reason to fear.

This class will explore how authors and texts draw attention to and find meaning in forgotten, obsolete things. We will begin the semester by constructing a definition of obsolescence, learning more generally about how to understand a complex idea and apprehend its shape, dimensions and limits. Students will then turn their attention to the world around them, analyzing how what we discard and what we reuse tells us about our own shifting values and desires. Finally, in an argumentative paper and digital project, students will consider how the treasures of today become the fossils of tomorrow.      

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:

  • 1.1 Definitional Paper (10%)
  • 2.1 Rhetorical Analysis (10%)
  • 2.2 Rhetorical Analysis Revision (15%)
  • 3.1 Argumentative Essay (15%)
  • 3.2 Argumentative Essay Revision (15%)
  • 4.1 Digital Archive (10%)
  • Oral Presentations (5%)
  • Short Papers (10%)
  • Participation (10%)
  • Peer Reviews (Mandatory) 

Required Textbooks and Handbooks

  • Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook. Norton, 2014.

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