Department of English

Kaitlyn Farrell Rodriguez


M.A., 2017, University of Texas at Austin,

Ph.D Candidate

Contact

Interests


20th and 21st Century Drama; Performance Studies, Feminist Theater

Biography


Courses


E 314V • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

35170 • Spring 2022
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM PMA 5.126
CDWr (also listed as WGS 301)

E 314V  |  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

Instructor:  Farrell Rodriguez, K

Unique #:  35170

Semester:  Spring 2022

Cross-lists:  WGS 301.27, 45265

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

Description:  What features “define” female creativity, culture, and art?  How are women’s identities and agencies portrayed and performed through literature and film?  How do the intersections of our own identities inform the way we understand and engage with gender, literature, and culture?  In this course, we will analyze several genres of art – including novels, poetry, film, and visual arts – to explore the multifaceted components of culture produced by authors who identify as women.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course carries a writing flag and a cultural diversity in the US flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.  Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience.  You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of several U.S. cultural groups that have experienced persistent marginalization.

Tentative Reading List:  Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929) (excerpts) • Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979) • Imogen Binnie, Nevada (2013) • Brief Supplementary Readings accessible on Canvas, including: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”; Gloria Anzaldúa “Speaking in Tongues: A Letter to Third World Women Writers”; Alice Walker “In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens”; Alice Sola Kim “Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying”.

Requirements & Grading:  The grade of this writing intensive course will be based on the following three components:  1) Participation through Weekly Discussion Posts (15%) and Daily Class Participation (5%); 2) Minor Writing Assignments (two brief essays, each of which are worth 10% each); and 3) Major Essays, which each require a substantial revision (these essays and their revisions constitute 60% total of the course grade).

 

E 314J • Literature And Film

34915 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.128
Wr

E 314J l  1-Literature and Film

 

Instructor:  Farrell, K

Unique #:  34915

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: Is it possible to create a film that perfectly translates prose into a visual medium?  What are the creative and ethical implications of adaptation? Should censorship play a role in regulating what we read and watch?  What are the relationships among prose, poetry, drama, and film? How and why should we learn to understand films as texts? In this course, we will examine both written and visual texts and their contexts in order to tackle such questions of creative production. Students will be asked to analyze texts that range in genre (drama, film, prose, graphic novel), age, and content to determine how readers and viewers engage with art.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Written Texts:  McEwan, Ian. Atonement.(2001); Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. (1606); Wilson, August. Fences. (1985).

 

Films:  Kursawa, Akira. (dir.) Throne of Blood. (1953); Polanski, Roman. (dir.) Macbeth. (1971); Washington, Denzel. (dir.) Fences. (2016); Wright, Joe. (dir.) Atonement.(2007).

 

Requirements & Grading: Grades will be based on 1) (10%) regular reading quizzes, postings, and activities; 2) (5%) leading one class seminar; 3) (10%) class attendance and participation; 4) three essays, each of which contribute to 25% of your final grade. The first essay will require while mandatory revision, while the second essay will offer an optional one.

RHE F306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84410 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 308
C1

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact Student Testing Services at (512)-232-2662 to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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