Department of English

Kiara Walker


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Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Public Thinkers-Wb

43650 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

In early 2019, Foreign Policy released their 10th annual list of 100 global thinkers offering a

“spotlight on the most influential people in the world—for better or worse.” The list, a statement on those who “had a profound impact on the planet in the last 12 months,” included politicians (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and John McCain), activists (The Women of the #MeToo Movement and The Parkland Students), artists and entertainers (Donald Glover and Lena Waithe), academics (Mary Claire-King and Douglas Irwin), readers’ choice (Michelle Obama and Jordan Peterson) and an animal (Koko the Gorilla). While the role of the public thinker has often been described as in decline during the twenty-first century, such a list—its existence and range—speaks to the mainstream presence and fixation on this role. 

 

This course will take a closer look at the rhetoric of and surrounding public thinkers with the aim of understanding how the title of public thinker is constructed rhetorically and what makes public thinkers persuasive for an intended audience. In doing so, we will work together to approach significant questions about public thinkers through a rhetorical lens, such as: What is a public thinker? How does one become designated as such? What role and function do these thinkers serve in society? How do public thinkers respond to and reflect society? How has the role of public thinkers changed over time, especially in response to changes in media? How do we understand, define, and approach contemporary public thinkers? Throughout the course, students will focus on chosen contemporary public thinker(s) in order to explore how public thinkers have been conceived of across time, analyze how audiences respond to and uptake persuasion from public thinkers, and present a position on the state of contemporary public thinkers.

 

Assessment Breakdown:

Short Writing Assignments: 20%

Definition Paper: 10%

Rhetorical Analysis: 10%

Rhetorical Analysis Revision: 15%

Proposal: 5%

Final Project and Reflection Essay: 20%

Final Presentation: 5%

Peer Review(s): 5%

Participation: 10%

 

Required Texts:

Everything’s an Argument. Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, Bedford/St. Martin’s

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Public Thinkers-Wb

42280 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

In early 2019, Foreign Policy released their 10th annual list of 100 global thinkers offering a “spotlight on the most influential people in the world—for better or worse.” The list, a statement on those who “had a profound impact on the planet in the last 12 months,” included politicians (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and John McCain), activists (The Women of the #MeToo Movement and The Parkland Students), artists and entertainers (Donald Glover and Lena Waithe), academics (Mary Claire-King and Douglas Irwin), readers’ choice (Michelle Obama and Jordan Peterson) and an animal (Koko the Gorilla). While the role of the public thinker has often been described as in decline during the twenty-first century, such a list—its existence and range—speaks to the mainstream presence and fixation on this role.

This course will take a closer look at the rhetoric of and surrounding public thinkers with the aim of understanding how the title of public thinker is constructed rhetorically and what makes public thinkers persuasive for an intended audience. In doing so, we will work together to approach significant questions about public thinkers through a rhetorical lens, such as: What is a public thinker? How does one become designated as such? What role and function do these thinkers serve in society? How do public thinkers respond to and reflect society? How has the role of public thinkers changed over time, especially in response to changes in media? How do we understand, define, and approach contemporary public thinkers? Throughout the course, students will focus on chosen contemporary public thinker(s) in order to explore how public thinkers have been conceived of across time, analyze how audiences respond to and uptake persuasion from public thinkers, and present a position on the state of contemporary public thinkers.

Assessment Breakdown:

  • Short Writing Assignments: 20%
  • Definition Paper: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Revision: 15%
  • Proposal: 5%
  • Final Project and Reflection Essay: 20%
  • Final Presentation: 5%
  • Peer Review(s): 5%
  • Participation: 10%

Required Texts:

Everything’s an Argument. Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, Bedford/St. Martin’s

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing-Wb

82130 • Summer 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
C1

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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