Department of English

Micah Bateman


Contact

Interests


Nineteenth-century American literature, American poetry after Whitman, poetry and poetics, digital humanities, textual/book studies

Biography


Micah Bateman is a Ph.D. candidate in English. He holds a M.F.A. in poetry from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he was a Teaching-Writing Fellow and postgraduate Provost's Fellow. He received the Poetry Society of America's 2013 Lyric Poetry Award, and his poems can be found in serials and anthologies such as Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, New Poetry from the Midwest, and Privacy Policy: The Anthology of Surveillance Poetics. His chapbook, Polis, was published in 2015 by The Catenary Press. He edits petripress.org and has reviewed collections of poetry for The Iowa Review and The Kenyon Review. At the University of Iowa, he co-developed the University's first Massive Open Online Courses in creative writing and literature for the International Writing Program, where he also taught international students as a distance learning instructor. His academic research focuses on nineteenth-century American literature, particularly the poetry of Walt Whitman.

Courses


E 314L • Reading Poetry

35125 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A203A
Wr

E 314L    5-Reading Poetry

 

Instructor:  Bateman, M

Unique #:  35125

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No (may change late in summer)

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course will introduce students to poems and approaches to reading them.  What even is a poem?  Mina Loy calls poetry “prose bewitched.”  Of contemporary poems, Stephanie Burt writes that they are “close calls with nonsense.”  On the other hand, William Carlos Williams says that “poetry is a machine.”  Can it be true that poetry is both magic and machine, nonsense and technology?  We’ll read a wide array of American poems closely to find out.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.  Students will also practice writing and publishing in new media, including editing Wikipedia entries, curating a digital repository, annotating poems on Poetry Genius, and creating videos or podcasts.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Most texts will be available on Canvas.  Additional, book-length texts may include The Book of the Dead by Muriel Rukeyser, The Bridge by Hart Crane, and Machinery by Macknight Black.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of weekly online discussion posts leading to three short papers, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted, and the last of which must be remixed into a new media project such as a video, podcast, or website.  There will also be in-class presentations/facilitations, other digital projects, and a group service-learning project.

E 314L • Reading Poetry

34962 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A207A
Wr

E 314L  l  5-Reading Poetry

 

Instructor:  Bateman, M

Unique #:  34962

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course will explore a new generation of predominantly American poets who have come of literary age after the advent of Web media.  We’ll look at the different ways people produce, perform, distribute, consume, metabolize, and recirculate poetry in the twenty-first century, especially with the proviso that everything personal is already political and vice versa.  But we’ll also think about what it means and how to read some of the following poets and poetries for pleasure:  Shane McCrae, Mark Leidner, Patricia Lockwood, Danez Smith, Jenny Zhang, Somaz Sharif, Ocean Vuong, American Sign Language poetry, found poetry, Twitter poetry, bacterial poetry, viral poetry, prose poetry, list poetry.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Alien vs. Predator by Michael Robbins, There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé by Morgan Parker, When My Brother Was an Aztec by Natalie Díaz, and the poetry of Warsan Shire as performed in Beyoncé’s “visual album,” Lemonade.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There will also be short responses (online and in reading journals), in-class presentations/facilitations, and a group service-learning project (30% of the final grade).

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