Department of English

Martha Karnes


Assistant Director of Lower-Division Writing
Martha Karnes

Contact

Interests


feminist disability studies, rhetoric of health and medicine, inclusive pedagogy, advocacy, technical communication, video games

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Rap

42800 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM FAC 7
Wr

In 2017, Nielson reported that rap & hip-hop music had surpassed rock music to become the most consumed genre. Artists like Drake and Future were streamed over 4 billion times in 2017. Rap music is more than just making it rain and dabbing; there is serious attention to history, culture, style, delivery, and performance. Rap, at its most basic level, is rhetorical. This course will challenge students to think critically about the rhetoric of and surrounding rap music. We will investigate how rap music and performances work rhetorically and intertextually, making use of music videos, live performances, lyrics and lyrical interpretations, and interviews with artists. This will also require us to enter conversations about rap music, culture, and history, and ask questions such as: How does rap make arguments about oppression, privilege, and relationships to the community? What role do rappers play as storytellers in a community? What role should rap play in politics or social justice movements? Is rap music misogynistic, and what does it mean to be a female rapper? This course will also task students with thinking about writing in new ways, as we discuss how rappers use various strategies and media to (re)invent and (re)mix.

 

Assessment Breakdown

  • Rap Genius Essay: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay Revision: 15%
  • Final Essay: 15%
  • Final Essay Revision: 20%
  • Short Writing Assignments: 20%
  • Participation: 10%

Required Texts:

Everything’s an Argument. Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, Bedford/St. Martin’s

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Rap

42510 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 104
Wr

In 2017, Nielson reported that rap & hip-hop music had surpassed rock music to become the most consumed genre. Artists like Drake and Future were streamed over 4 billion times in 2017. Rap music is more than just making it rain and dabbing; there is serious attention to history, culture, style, delivery, and performance. Rap, at its most basic level, is rhetorical. This course will challenge students to think critically about the rhetoric of and surrounding rap music. We will investigate how rap music and performances work rhetorically and intertextually, making use of music videos, live performances, lyrics and lyrical interpretations, and interviews with artists. This will also require us to enter conversations about rap music, culture, and history, and ask questions such as: How does rap make arguments about oppression, privilege, and relationships to the community? What role do rappers play as storytellers in a community? What role should rap play in politics or social justice movements? Is rap music misogynistic, and what does it mean to be a female rapper? This course will also task students with thinking about writing in new ways, as we discuss how rappers use various strategies and media to (re)invent and (re)mix.

 

Assessment Breakdown

  • Rap Genius Essay: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay Revision: 15%
  • Final Essay: 15%
  • Final Essay Revision: 20%
  • Short Writing Assignments: 20%
  • Participation: 10%

Required Texts:

Everything’s an Argument. Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, Bedford/St. Martin’s

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Rap

83410 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM SAC 5.102
Wr

In 2017, Nielson reported that rap & hip-hop music had surpassed rock music to become the most consumed genre. Artists like Drake and Future were streamed over 4 billion times in 2017. Rap music is more than just making it rain and dabbing; there is serious attention to history, culture, style, delivery, and performance. Rap, at its most basic level, is rhetorical. This course will challenge students to think critically about the rhetoric of and surrounding rap music. We will investigate how rap music and performances work rhetorically and intertextually, making use of music videos, live performances, lyrics and lyrical interpretations, and interviews with artists. This will also require us to enter conversations about rap music, culture, and history, and ask questions such as: How does rap make arguments about oppression, privilege, and relationships to the community? What role do rappers play as storytellers in a community? What role should rap play in politics or social justice movements? Is rap music misogynistic, and what does it mean to be a female rapper? This course will also task students with thinking about writing in new ways, as we discuss how rappers use various strategies and media to (re)invent and (re)mix.

Assessment Breakdown

  • Rap Genius Essay: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay Revision: 15%
  • Final Essay: 15%
  • Final Essay Revision: 20%
  • Short Writing Assignments: 20%
  • Participation: 10%

Required Texts:

  • Everything’s an Argument. Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz, Bedford/St. Martin’s

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