Department of English

Patrick Aaron Harris


MLitt/MFA in Shakespeare & Performance, Mary Baldwin University

Contact

Interests


Shakespeare and early modern drama, adaptation theory, premodern critical race studies, postcolonial theory, diaspora studies, dramaturgy and performance studies

Courses


E 314L • Cult Classics-Wb

35550 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L  l  9-Cult Classics-WB

 

Instructor:  Harris, P

Unique #:  35550

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  none

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Cult classics are often defined as niche works having small, highly devoted fanbases, despite lacking mainstream popularity at the time of their release.  Still many a cult classic have endured in obscurity only to become a wildly popular cultural or intellectual phenomenon.  How, then, do these mostly or originally unnoticed works earn the status of “classic”?  Can something with only a cult following be a “classic”?  In this course we will take a two-pronged approach to understanding the literary and cultural significance of cult classics.  First, our readings will focus on works of speculative fiction (“spec-fic”), itself a niche genre and one that people often turn to for examples of cult classic literature and film.  And second, we will study a kind of “cult” that produces such classics: the “cult of personality” which engenders narratives about authoritarian regimes or religious zealotry devoted to a single person or institution.  We will consider the “genre-defining” tropes of speculative fiction that make these works classics, and we will reflect on the ideologies of cults of personality and how they may speak to the past, present, or future of society.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative texts:  Dune, Frank Herbert; 1984, George Orwell; Parable of the Sower, Octavia Butler; The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins; selected short readings from Ursula K. Le Guin and Ray Bradbury.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Students will demonstrate their learning in a short analytical essay that must be revised and resubmitted (25%), a group annotated bibliography (15%) a creative research project (25%), and a series of reading responses, mini-projects, and group discussions (35%).

E 314L • Cult Classics-Wb

34365 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L  l  9-Cult Classics

 

Instructor:  Harris, P

Unique #:  34365

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Cult classics are often defined as niche works having small, highly devoted fanbases, despite lacking mainstream popularity at the time of their release.  Still many a cult classic have endured in obscurity only to become a wildly popular cultural or intellectual phenomenon.  How, then, do these mostly or originally unnoticed works earn the status of “classic”?  Can something with only a cult following be a “classic”?  In this course we will take a two-pronged approach to understanding the literary and cultural significance of cult classics.  First, our readings will focus on works of speculative fiction (“spec-fic”), itself a niche genre and one that people often turn to for examples of cult classic literature and film.  And second, we will study a kind of “cult” that produces such classics: the “cult of personality” which engenders narratives about authoritarian regimes or religious zealotry devoted to a single person or institution.  We will consider the “genre-defining” tropes of speculative fiction that make these works classics, and we will reflect on the ideologies of cults of personality and how they may speak to the past, present, or future of society.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative texts:  Dune, Frank Herbert; 1984, George Orwell; Parable of the Sower, Octavia Butler; The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins; selected short readings from Ursula K. Le Guin and Ray Bradbury.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Students will demonstrate their learning in a short analytical essay that must be revised and resubmitted (25%), a group annotated bibliography (15%) a creative research project (25%), and a series of reading responses, mini-projects, and group discussions (35%).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Fashion

42805 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 304
Wr

“Clothes mean nothing until someone lives in them”—Marc Jacobs

“Style is a way to say who you are without having to speak”—Rachel Zoe

“I don’t do fashion, I am fashion”—Coco Chanel

                  When we talk about “fashion statements” we are usually describing the clothing someone might wear to call attention to themselves. What would it mean, though, to think of all fashion as making a statement? All of us use clothing, makeup, jewelry and other accessories as a way of expressing our interests, values, and beliefs. Fashion is a way of saying (and showing) who we are. At the same time, all of us encounter the fashion industry and are susceptible to the way designers and advertisers play on our desires to belong, to live luxuriously, or to be seen as beautiful. We are constantly filtering messages and images meant to tell us what to look like and who to be.

In this class, we will use fashion as a medium for learning and practicing the elements of effective argumentation. As our primary “texts” we will read like fashion journalism and style reviews, but we will also watch clips from films, television, music videos, and video blogs to see what arguments people make about fashion or with fashion. Students will also maintain a blog that they will update regularly in response to prompts. These blogs will allow students to practice critical writing skills and to learn how to use images and graphic design persuasively. The course will culminate in a final research project of the students’ own making (with instructor approval) that critiques fashion’s role in shaping our individual and interpersonal lives.

Grading Breakdown:

  • 10 Blog Posts (25%)
  • Major Projects (75%)
  • Project 1: Defining “Fashion” Essay (15%)
  • Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (15%)
  • Project 3.1: Aesthetic Argument (20%)
  • Project 3.2: Aesthetic Argument Revision (25%)

Required Texts:

  • Everything’s an Argument, 7th (2016)—paperback or ebook
  • Textiles and Clothing Sustainability: Sustainability, Fashion, and Consumption (ebook available thru UT Libraries)
  • Rules for Writers, 8th

Other major texts will include clips from: The Devil Wears Prada, Paris is Burning, Project Runway, America’s Next Top Model, RuPaul’s Drag Race, Queer Eye/Queer Eye for the Straight Guy

Optional Texts:

  • 20,000 Years of Fashion (1987)—available through UT Libraries

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Fashion

42480 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 1.108
Wr

“Clothes mean nothing until someone lives in them”—Marc Jacobs

“Style is a way to say who you are without having to speak”—Rachel Zoe

“I don’t do fashion, I am fashion”—Coco Chanel

                  When we talk about “fashion statements” we are usually describing the clothing someone might wear to call attention to themselves. What would it mean, though, to think of all fashion as making a statement? All of us use clothing, makeup, jewelry and other accessories as a way of expressing our interests, values, and beliefs. Fashion is a way of saying (and showing) who we are. At the same time, all of us encounter the fashion industry and are susceptible to the way designers and advertisers play on our desires to belong, to live luxuriously, or to be seen as beautiful. We are constantly filtering messages and images meant to tell us what to look like and who to be.

In this class, we will use fashion as a medium for learning and practicing the elements of effective argumentation. As our primary “texts” we will read like fashion journalism and style reviews, but we will also watch clips from films, television, music videos, and video blogs to see what arguments people make about fashion or with fashion. Students will also maintain a blog that they will update regularly in response to prompts. These blogs will allow students to practice critical writing skills and to learn how to use images and graphic design persuasively. The course will culminate in a final research project of the students’ own making (with instructor approval) that critiques fashion’s role in shaping our individual and interpersonal lives.

Grading Breakdown:

  • 10 Blog Posts (25%)
  • Major Projects (75%)
  • Project 1: Defining “Fashion” Essay (15%)
  • Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (15%)
  • Project 3.1: Aesthetic Argument (20%)
  • Project 3.2: Aesthetic Argument Revision (25%)

Required Texts:

  • Everything’s an Argument, 7th (2016)—paperback or ebook
  • Textiles and Clothing Sustainability: Sustainability, Fashion, and Consumption (ebook available thru UT Libraries)
  • Rules for Writers, 8th

Other major texts will include clips from: The Devil Wears Prada, Paris is Burning, Project Runway, America’s Next Top Model, RuPaul’s Drag Race, Queer Eye/Queer Eye for the Straight Guy

Optional Texts:

  • 20,000 Years of Fashion (1987)—available through UT Libraries

RHE F309K • Rhetoric Of Fashion

83390 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BEN 1.108
Wr

“Clothes mean nothing until someone lives in them”—Marc Jacobs

“Style is a way to say who you are without having to speak”—Rachel Zoe

“I don’t do fashion, I am fashion”—Coco Chanel 

                  When we talk about “fashion statements” we are usually describing the clothing someone might wear to call attention to themselves. What would it mean, though, to think of all fashion as making a statement? All of us use clothing, makeup, jewelry and other accessories as a way of expressing our interests, values, and beliefs. Fashion is a way of saying (and showing) who we are. At the same time, all of us encounter the fashion industry and are susceptible to the way designers and advertisers play on our desires to belong, to live luxuriously, or to be seen as beautiful. We are constantly filtering messages and images meant to tell us what to look like and who to be.

In this class, we will use fashion as a medium for learning and practicing the elements of effective argumentation. As our primary “texts” we will read like fashion journalism and style reviews, but we will also watch clips from films, television, music videos, and video blogs to see what arguments people make about fashion or with fashion. Students will also maintain a blog that they will update regularly in response to prompts. These blogs will allow students to practice critical writing skills and to learn how to use images and graphic design persuasively. The course will culminate in a final research project of the students’ own making (with instructor approval) that critiques fashion’s role in shaping our individual and interpersonal lives.

Grading Breakdown:

  • 10 Blog Posts (25%)
  • Major Projects (75%)
  • Project 1: Defining “Fashion” Essay (15%)
  • Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (15%)
  • Project 3.1: Aesthetic Argument (20%)
  • Project 3.2: Aesthetic Argument Revision (25%)

Required Texts:

  • Everything’s an Argument, 7th (2016)—paperback or ebook
  • Textiles and Clothing Sustainability: Sustainability, Fashion, and Consumption (ebook available thru UT Libraries)
  • Rules for Writers, 8th

Other major texts will include clips from: The Devil Wears Prada, Paris is Burning, Project Runway, America’s Next Top Model, RuPaul’s Drag Race, Queer Eye/Queer Eye for the Straight Guy

Optional Texts:

20,000 Years of Fashion (1987)—available through UT Libraries

Curriculum Vitae


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