Department of English

Maria Roxana Loza


Ph.D. Student
Maria Roxana Loza

Contact

Interests


Children’s and Young Adult literature, Latinx Studies, Critical Disability Studies, Critical Race Theory

Biography



Rice University: B.A. in English, French, and Psychology

Kansas State University: M.A. in Children's Literature

 

PUBLICATIONS:

Loza, M. Roxana. “’He doesn’t talk’: Silence, Trauma, and Fathers in Aristotle and DanteDiscover the Secrets of the Universe and I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter.” Label Me Latina/o. Forthcoming.

Loza, M. Roxana. "Cristina Herrera's ChicaNerds in Chicana Young Adult Literature: Brown and Nerdy." Research on Diversity in Youth Literature. (Review) Forthcoming.

Loza, M. Roxana. ""Breaking (Open) the Internet for Scholarly Research." The Lion and the Unicorn. (Pedagogy Forum).Forthcoming. 

Mills, J. Elizabeth, Maria Roxana Loza, Breanna J. McDaniel, Nadia Mansour, Karen Chandler, and Michelle H. Martin. "Many Hands Make Rich Work: Mentorship and Collaboration in a Diverse Scholarly Space." Research on Diversity in Youth Literature. Winter 2020. (Special Forum)

Loza, Maria Roxana and Tanya Gonzalez. “A Bone to Pick: Día de los Muertos in Children’s Literature.” Voices of Resistance: Essays on Chican@ Children's Literature. Ed. Christina Herrera, Larissa Mercado-López, and Laura Alamillo. Rowman and Littlefield Education (December 2017).

 

See "External Links" for open access publications.

Courses


E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34925 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.212
Wr

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor: Loza, M

Unique #:  34925

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: Questions about Banned Books often revolve around children’s and young adult literature.  Who decides what is “appropriate” for a child to read? Before a child can get a book in their hands, it has gone through many adult gatekeepers (parents, teachers, librarians, school boards, etc.).  The protective instinct to shield children from painful subjects is not wrong in itself, but the censorship of content frequently ends up occluding grave social evils.  Books can be powerful vehicles for social mores and ideologies so an analysis of why some texts are frequently challenged can tell us a lot about what a society values and what it seeks to suppress.

 

We will use youth and childhood as a lens into our texts’ exploration of issues such as race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability.  Our goal will be to see these works as embedded in specific contexts that must be explored in order to understand, as much as possible, the cultural and political nuances of the texts.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts: Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi; The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas; The Astonishing Color of After, by Emily X.R. Pan; The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, by Mark Haddon; Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, by Benjamin Alire Sáenz.

 

We will also have shorter reading assignments (scholarly articles, blogs, reviews, etc.) that will be available via Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, 10%; Participation, 20%; Reading Quizzes, 10%; Close Reading Essay, 10%; Close Reading and Context Essay, 15%; Research Essay, 35%.

 

The second essay requires substantial revision and resubmission.  The first essay may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

35165 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122
CDWr (also listed as MAS 314)

E 314V  l  3-Mexican American Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Loza, M

Unique #:  35165

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course is a general introduction to the literature written by and about Mexican Americans/Chicanos (U.S. citizens of Mexican ancestry).  We will use youth and childhood as a lens into our texts’ exploration of issues such as race, gender, class, and sexuality.

 

Students should expect to develop some understanding of the specific cultural, historical, and political contexts that inform the literature.  Knowledge of these contexts will enhance our understanding of these authors’ politics and aesthetics.  We have a range of texts including novels, fiction, poetry, graphic novels, and film.  Our goal will be to see these works as embedded in specific contexts that must be explored in order to understand, as much as possible, the cultural and political nuances of the texts.  Students should also remember that this class fulfills the requirement for a substantial writing component course and serves as an introduction to the major.  As such, a good deal of time, both in and outside of the classroom, will be devoted to working on original compositions and learning about critical approaches to texts.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  

Print:  The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros; …y no se lo tragó la tierra, Tomás Rivera (bilingual edition); Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Benjamin Alire Sáenz; I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, Erika L. Sánchez; Lowriders to the Center of the Earth, Cathy Camper and Raúl The Third (illus.).

 

Films:  Coco (2017); Quinceañera (2006)

 

We will also have shorter reading assignments (scholarly articles, blogs, reviews, etc.) that will be available via Canvas.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance: 10%; Participation: 20%; (Close) Reading Quizzes: 10%; Close Reading Essay (Short): 10%; Close Reading and Context Essay: 15%; Research Essay: 35%

 

The first essay requires substantial revision and resubmission.  The second essay may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.