Department of English

Rosy Mack


Doctoral Student, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin

Contact

Interests


Late 20th Century Feminist Publishing, Print Culture, Queer Theory, Feminist Theory, Genre Fiction, Social Movement Cultures, Legal Theory

Biography


I am a fourth year doctoral student at the Department of English. I received my MA here at UT in 2018 and wrote my Masters Report on femininist print and activist culture around Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp. I received my BA in Arabic and Persian from SOAS, University of London, in 2016.

I'm now working on my doctoral dissertation, which explores the role of the prominent British feminist publisher, The Women's Press, in the emergence, sustenance and expansion of a feminist counterpublic.

If you want to read more, some of my writing has appeared in the Activist History Review and E3W Review of Books.

Courses


E 314V • Gay/Lesbian Lit/Culture-Wb

35590 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
CDWr (also listed as WGS 301)

E 314V  l  4-Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture-WB

 

Instructor: Mack, R

Unique:  35590

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  WGS 301.12, 45975

 

Prerequisite:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This class will provide an opportunity to learn about novels and visual texts which affirm queer existence, survival, and community.  As we read these texts, we will familiarise ourselves with the social movements which made such expression possible, including the working-class lesbian bar subcultures, the Stonewall riots of 1969, and the Situationist activism of Act Up and Queer Nation during the AIDS crisis.  As we journey through forms of 20th century queer expression we will see the development and politicization of sexual identities and the resistance to structural forces that made queer lives unlivable.  These histories of struggle helped to shape the texts we will read together. Just as each of us, on entering the classroom, will come with our own knowledges, experiences, and identities, the course’s core texts have been chosen to keep us accountable to the rich, intersecting, and complex constitution of contemporary queer life.

 

First, we will hone our close reading skills by working through a recent, experimental work of queer literature, Ali Smith’s Girl Meets Boy.  Students will be asked to produce close readings of selected passages of text, in order to build a shared vocabulary and competence around thematic and formal features.  In our second unit, we will start our research journey, reading novels and short stories alongside their historical and cultural context.  Students will begin to select and investigate secondary sources – historical, critical and theoretical work on queer texts.  Finally, in the last third of our time together, students will produce writing which combines their close reading and research skills

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

Requirements & Grading:  5 Short Writing Assignments: 20%; Participation and In-Class work: 10% Presentations: 5%; Close Reading Essay: 15%; Research Essay: 20%; Final Paper: 25%; Peer Review: 5%.

 

Students will have the opportunity to revise one of their major essays for a new grade.

 

The final grading scale is as follows (please keep in mind that UT does not recognize the grade of A+):  A = 94-100; A- = 90-93; B+ = 87-89; B = 84-86; B- = 80-83; C+ = 77-79; C = 74-76; C- = 70-73; D+ = 67-69; D = 64-66; D- = 60-63; F = below 60.

 

Required Texts Novels:  Ali Smith, Girl Meets Boy; Samuel Delany, Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand; Sheila Ortiz Taylor, Faultline.

 

Required Texts Visual:  Cheryl Dunye, The Watermelon Woman, Feature Film (Available for free on Kanopy, through UT subscription); Jaime Cortez, Sexile, Graphic Novel (Open Access).

 

Short fiction and criticism will be made available on Canvas by the instructor.

WGS 301 • Gay & Lesbian Lit/Cultr-Wb

44360 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
CDWr

Please check back for updates.

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Utopia/Resistance

42830 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 7
Wr

Arundhati Roy — 'Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.'

Where do we find hope if everything seems to be falling to pieces? How do we become optimists about our own ability to change the world? It may seem like the end-times, but moments of pessimism have produced some of the most innovative and persuasive visions of the future. Utopia is the space where activist knowledge and belief in the capacity of human action meets the invention of other worlds. In this course we will explore various strands of utopian cultural production and the movements which give rise to them. We will investigate the two faces of utopia: challenging the world as it is and imagining what the world could be. We will begin by defining what utopia has meant and can mean through short visual texts, fiction, manifestos and theoretical works. We will work together to ask: what do they critique and how? What are the relationships between utopian thought and activism? We will then choose our own utopian texts, working individually to locate them in their historical and political contexts and analyze their rhetorical techniques. Possible texts choices could include televisual utopias, such as Black Mirror’s ‘San Junipero,’ Neil Gaiman’s comic Miracleman, or excerpts from novels like Nisi Shawl’s Everfair and Ursula K. LeGuin’s The Left Hand of Darkness. Finally, we will use utopian rhetorical techniques to invent our own utopian imaginaries, either in the form of a persuasive manifesto, or a piece of short fiction accompanied by a commentary. 

  • Project 1: Annotated Bibliography (15%)
  • Peer Review
  • Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (10%)
  • Peer Review
  • Revision (15%)
  • Project 3: Utopian vision or manifesto (15%)
  • Peer Review (5%)
  • Revision (15%)
  • Short Writing Assignments (20%)
  • Class Presentation (5%) 

Required Texts:

  1. The Rhetoric of Literate Action, Bazerman, Charles, Parlor Press (open source), 2013
  2. All other readings will be provided on Canvas by the instructor.

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Utopia/Resistance

42540 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 7
Wr

Arundhati Roy — 'Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.'

Where do we find hope if everything seems to be falling to pieces? How do we become optimists about our own ability to change the world? It may seem like the end-times, but moments of pessimism have produced some of the most innovative and persuasive visions of the future. Utopia is the space where activist knowledge and belief in the capacity of human action meets the invention of other worlds. In this course we will explore various strands of utopian cultural production and the movements which give rise to them. We will investigate the two faces of utopia: challenging the world as it is and imagining what the world could be. We will begin by defining what utopia has meant and can mean through short visual texts, fiction, manifestos and theoretical works. We will work together to ask: what do they critique and how? What are the relationships between utopian thought and activism? We will then choose our own utopian texts, working individually to locate them in their historical and political contexts and analyze their rhetorical techniques. Possible texts choices could include televisual utopias, such as Black Mirror’s ‘San Junipero,’ Neil Gaiman’s comic Miracleman, or excerpts from novels like Nisi Shawl’s Everfair and Ursula K. LeGuin’s The Left Hand of Darkness. Finally, we will use utopian rhetorical techniques to invent our own utopian imaginaries, either in the form of a persuasive manifesto, or a piece of short fiction accompanied by a commentary. 

  • Project 1: Annotated Bibliography (15%)
  • Peer Review
  • Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (10%)
  • Peer Review
  • Revision (15%)
  • Project 3: Utopian vision or manifesto (15%)
  • Peer Review (5%)
  • Revision (15%)
  • Short Writing Assignments (20%)
  • Class Presentation (5%) 

Required Texts:

  1. The Rhetoric of Literate Action, Bazerman, Charles, Parlor Press (open source), 2013
  2. All other readings will be provided on Canvas by the instructor.

Curriculum Vitae


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