Department of English

Ansley Colclough


Contact

Interests


continental philosophy, media theory, tactical media, the rhetoric of social movements, biopolitics/necropolitcs, solidarity and identification

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Israel/Palestine

43855 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 104
Wr

On May 14th, 1948, the section of British-occupied land reserved for Jews was declared a self governing nation-state: Israel. Israelis call this day “Yom Ha'atzmaut” or “Independence Day.” Palestinians call it “Nak-ba” - “Day of Disaster.” Since that day, this region has been the site of numerous geopolitical conflicts that produce many questions. What is the religious significance of Jerusalem? Why was moving the Israeli embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem such a big deal? When does criticism of Israel slide into antisemitism? How important is Israel/Palestine as an issue to Muslim and Jewish voters in the United States? What is a “two-state” solution and is it possible to achieve it? Who is “native” or “indigionous” to the region? How might rethinking the “nation-state” present a more democratic solution?

 

Rather than advocate a side regarding the legitimacy of either nation-state’s claim to the region, this course examines the kinds of arguments around Israel/Palestine (I/P) that have been advanced and received both within and outside the Levant. Using the concept of a “nation” as a lens, we will unpack representations of Israel/Palestine in various forms of media. Although the issues around I/P are global, this class is limited to exploring relationships between Israel, Palestine, and the United States.

 

Assignments and Grading

Participation (CWF, Canvas posts, in-class Zoom discussions):10%

Short Writing Assignments and Discussion/Response: 25%

Peer Review:5%

Definition Argument Essay 15%

Evaluation Argument Essay 15%

Essay 3: Proposal Project 15%

Annotated Bibliography 10%

Student Led Discussion: 5%

 

Texts

Textbook:

  • Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Everything’s an Argument. Eight edition, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2018.

Additional Assigned Books:

  • Bunton, Martin. The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: A Short Introduction. Oxford University Press, 2013.
  • Side by Side: Parallel Histories of Israel-Palestine. Ed. Adwan, Sami, Dan Bar-On, and Eyal Naveh.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Responsibility-Wb

43595 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

"A famous philosopher once said “with great power, comes great responsibility.” Yet “responsibility” is a nebulous concept, despite the term’s prominence in our era’s most fiercely debated issues. To what extent are individuals “responsible” for recycling when a handful of corporations produce most of the world’s pollution? If Facebook is responsible for sharing misinformation, does the responsibility to curb the problem fall on the company, its users, or the government? What responsibilities does the U.S. owe to non-U.S. citizens fleeing a geopolitical crisis that U.S. military intervention may have exacerbated? In short, what do individuals, groups, and institutions “owe” to one another and future generations?

This course takes a closer look at the concept of “responsibility.” In this writing intensive class, students will select and research a contemporary controversy to examine how “responsibility” is attributed in times of crisis. Possible topics range from whistleblowing, #MeToo, the Second Amendment, online “cancel culture,” climate change, media coverage of mass shootings, immigrantion and refugees, the Second Gulf war, Medicaid for All, and student loan debt. Assigned texts may include news articles, films, podcasts, and multimedia. Our purpose is not to establish a single, definitive definition of “responsibility,” but to take the fluidity of the term as an opportunity to investigate how the term functions rhetorically -- and its effects -- across multiple high-stakes conversations.


Assignments and Grade Breakdown:
Participation (In-Class Participation, CWFs): 10% 4 Short Writing Assignments: 25%
Peer Review: 5%
Project 1: Evaluation Argument Essay 15%
Project 2: Annotated Bibliography 15%
Project 3: Rhetorical Analysis Essay 15%
Project 4: Counterargument Essay 15%

Texts:
Glenn, Cheryl. The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing. Third Edition, Cengage Learning, 2017.
Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Everything’s an Argument. Sixth edition, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2012.
Roberts-Miller, Trish. Demagoguery and Democracy. The Experiment, 2017. Other course material to be provided by the instructor on Canvas."

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Responsibility-Wb

42265 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

A famous philosopher once said “with great power, comes great responsibility.” Yet
“responsibility” is a nebulous concept, despite the term’s prominence in our era’s most fiercely
debated issues. To what extent are individuals “responsible” for recycling when a handful of
corporations produce most of the world’s pollution? If Facebook is responsible for sharing
misinformation, does the responsibility to curb the problem fall on the company, its users, or the
government? What responsibilities does the U.S. owe to non-U.S. citizens fleeing a geopolitical
crisis that U.S. military intervention may have exacerbated? In short, what do individuals,
groups, and institutions “owe” to one another and future generations?


This course takes a closer look at the concept of “responsibility.” In this writing intensive class,
students will select and research a contemporary controversy to examine how “responsibility”
is attributed in times of crisis. Possible topics range from whistleblowing, #MeToo, the Second
Amendment, online “cancel culture,” climate change, media coverage of mass shootings,
immigrantion and refugees, the Second Gulf war, Medicaid for All, and student loan debt.
Assigned texts may include news articles, films, podcasts, and multimedia. Our purpose is not to
establish a single, definitive definition of “responsibility,” but to take the fluidity of the term as
an opportunity to investigate how the term functions rhetorically -- and its effects -- across
multiple high-stakes conversations.


Assignments and Grade Breakdown:


Participation (In-Class Participation, CWFs): 10%
4 Short Writing Assignments: 25%
Peer Review: 5%
Project 1: Evaluation Argument Essay 15%
Project 2: Annotated Bibliography 15%
Project 3: Rhetorical Analysis Essay 15%
Project 4: Counterargument Essay 15%


Texts:
Glenn, Cheryl. The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing . Third Edition, Cengage
Learning, 2017.
Lunsford, Andrea A. and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Everything’s an Argument . Sixth edition,
Bedford/St. Martin's, 2012.
Roberts-Miller, Trish. Demagoguery and Democracy. The Experiment, 2017.
Other course material to be provided by the instructor on Canvas.

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