Department of English

Samantha Allan


Contact

Interests


20th and 21st century American poetry and experimental nonfiction, feminist and critical race theory, archival theory

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Beauty-Wb

43580 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

“Beauty was not simply something to behold; it was something one could do.” - Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

 

Many people begin thinking about their relationship to beauty at a startlingly young age. From magazines, to billboards, to the hyper-aestheticized annals of Instagram, the beauty industry dazzles and accosts us, conditioning the way we see, value, and interact with each other and with ourselves. At times, the criteria for determining what it means to be beautiful can feel so absolute—in part, because it is so pervasive—that we forget the role we play in building, challenging, and reshaping that criteria to address the term’s abuses. Negotiating the rhetoric of beauty can mean fighting injustice in the work place, raising our expectations for interpersonal relationships, and divorcing ourselves from the idea that how we look determines what we’re worth. It can also open new pathways for creativity and fulfillment. 

 

This course will explore the way our society constructs, upholds, resists, and markets beauty standards. In particular, it will focus on the complicated role of beauty in feminist discourse. Questions of interest might include: how does the pursuit of beauty empower and inspire us, and in what ways does it exert unwelcome pressure upon our lives? Does the beauty industry succeed in creating inclusive community spaces, and what happens when the rhetoric of self-care becomes commodified into a skin-care routine? In what ways might beauty assist in gendering our experiences with age, youth, and the passing of time? How are definitions of beauty conditioned by racism, classism, and gender essentialism, and what is being done to challenge these definitions? What should be?

 

Assignments:

 

Participation (10%)

 

Journal Entries – 3 (15%)

 

Short Papers (20%) including:

  1. Short analysis 1 (10%)

-                       2. Short analysis 2 (10%)

 

Annotated Bibliography (15%)

 

4-6 Page Rhetorical Analysis (20%)

 

Final Project (20%)

 

Required Text:

 

Glenn, Cheryl. The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing. Cengage Learning, 2018. 

 

All other materials will be provided on Canvas by the instructor.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Beauty-Wb

42234 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-4:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

“Beauty was not simply something to behold; it was something one could do.” - Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

Many people begin thinking about their relationship to beauty at a startlingly young age. From magazines, to billboards, to the hyper-aestheticized annals of Instagram, the beauty industry dazzles and accosts us, conditioning the way we see, value, and interact with each other and with ourselves. At times, the criteria for determining what it means to be beautiful can feel so absolute—in part, because it is so pervasive—that we forget the role we play in building, challenging, and reshaping that criteria to address the term’s abuses. Negotiating the rhetoric of beauty can mean fighting injustice in the work place, raising our expectations for interpersonal relationships, and divorcing ourselves from the idea that how we look determines what we’re worth. It can also open new pathways for creativity and fulfillment.

This course will explore the way our society constructs, upholds, resists, and markets beauty standards. In particular, it will focus on the complicated role of beauty in feminist discourse. Questions of interest might include: how does the pursuit of beauty empower and inspire us, and in what ways does it exert unwelcome pressure upon our lives? Does the beauty industry succeed in creating inclusive community spaces, and what happens when the rhetoric of self-care becomes commodified into a skin-care routine? In what ways might beauty assist in gendering our experiences with age, youth, and the passing of time? How are definitions of beauty conditioned by racism, classism, and gender essentialism, and what is being done to challenge these definitions? What should be?

Assignments:

  • Participation (10%)
  • Journal Entries – 3 (15%)
  • Short Papers (20%) including:
    • Short analysis 1 (10%)
    • Short analysis 2 (10%)
  • Annotated Bibliography (15%)
  • 4-6 Page Rhetorical Analysis (20%)
  • Final Project (20%)

 

Required Text:

  • Glenn, Cheryl. The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing. Cengage Learning, 2018. 
  • All other materials will be provided on Canvas by the instructor.

RHE F309K • Rhetoric Of Beauty-Wb

82114 • Summer 2020
Internet; Asynchronous
Wr

“Beauty was not simply something to behold; it was something one could do.” - Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

Many people begin thinking about their relationship to beauty at a startlingly young age. From magazines, to billboards, to the hyper-aestheticized annals of Instagram, the beauty industry dazzles and accosts us, conditioning the way we see, value, and interact with each other and with ourselves. At times, the criteria for determining what it means to be beautiful can feel so absolute—in part, because it is so pervasive—that we forget the role we play in building, challenging, and reshaping that criteria to address the term’s abuses. Negotiating the rhetoric of beauty can mean fighting injustice in the work place, raising our expectations for interpersonal relationships, and divorcing ourselves from the idea that how we look determines what we’re worth. It can also open new pathways for creativity and fulfillment.

This course will explore the way our society constructs, upholds, resists, and markets beauty standards. In particular, it will focus on the complicated role of beauty in feminist discourse. Questions of interest might include: how does the pursuit of beauty empower and inspire us, and in what ways does it exert unwelcome pressure upon our lives? Does the beauty industry succeed in creating inclusive community spaces, and what happens when the rhetoric of self-care becomes commodified into a skin-care routine? In what ways might beauty assist in gendering our experiences with age, youth, and the passing of time? How are definitions of beauty conditioned by racism, classism, and gender essentialism, and what is being done to challenge these definitions? What should be?

Assignments:

  • Weekly Discussion Posts (15%)
  • 1-2 Page Journal Entries – 3 (15%)
  • 4-6 Page Rhetorical Analysis (20%)
  • Rhetorical Analysis Revision (15%)
  • Annotated Bibliography (15%)
  • Final Project: Proposal or Initiative (20%)

Required Text:

  • Glenn, Cheryl. The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing. Cengage Learning, 2018 (available either in print or eBook form.)
  • All other materials will be provided on Canvas by the instructor.

 

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