Department of English

Teri Fickling


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Courses


E 314L • Reading Poetry-Wb

35540 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L  l  5-Reading Poetry-WB

 

Instructor:  Fickling, T

Unique #:  35540

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Audre Lorde describes poetry as “a vital necessity of our existence.”  This course will help students consider why that description might be right, and why poetry has historically played such an important role in people’s lives.  Sometimes it is a container for the public sharing of intimate expression; sometimes, a vehicle for social justice.  From antiquity onwards, writers have turned to poetry to structure their experience, to experiment with language’s boundaries, and to effect societal change.  In E314L Reading Poetry, students will examine a range of American and British poems from the early modern period to our contemporary moment.  Starting with a close reading unit, this course will empower students to construct a poem’s meaning through attention to particular forms, such as the sonnet and free verse, and specific poetic devices, such as enjambment, meter, and rhyme.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho, translated by Anne Carson; Citizen: An American Lyric, by Claudia Rankine; and a variety of poems available through Canvas, including selections by Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Bishop, Terrance Hayes, Langston Hughes, John Keats, John Milton, Theodore Roethke, William Shakespeare, Walt Whitman, William Carlos Williams, and Monica Youn.

 

Requirements and Grading:  The final grade will be composed of three short papers, the first of which will be undergo a mandatory revision after peer review and instructor conference.  The second paper will count for 20% of the course grade, and the final paper will be worth 30%. The remaining 30% of the overall grade will comprise short writing assignments, participation, discussion posts, and student led discussion or presentations.

E 314L • Reading Poetry-Wb

34345 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L  l  5-Reading Poetry

 

Instructor:  Fickling, T

Unique #:  34345

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Audre Lorde describes poetry as “a vital necessity of our existence.”  This course will help students consider why that description might be right, and why poetry has historically played such an important role in people’s lives.  Sometimes it is a container for the public sharing of intimate expression; sometimes, a vehicle for social justice.  From antiquity onwards, writers have turned to poetry to structure their experience, to experiment with language’s boundaries, and to effect societal change.  In E314L Reading Poetry, students will examine a range of American and British poems from the early modern period to our contemporary moment.  Starting with a close reading unit, this course will empower students to construct a poem’s meaning through attention to particular forms, such as the sonnet and free verse, and specific poetic devices, such as enjambment, meter, and rhyme.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho, translated by Anne Carson; Citizen: An American Lyric, by Claudia Rankine; and a variety of poems available through Canvas, including selections by Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Bishop, Terrance Hayes, Langston Hughes, John Keats, John Milton, Theodore Roethke, William Shakespeare, Walt Whitman, William Carlos Williams, and Monica Youn.

 

Requirements and Grading:  The final grade will be composed of three short papers, the first of which will be undergo a mandatory revision after peer review and instructor conference.  The second paper will count for 20% of the course grade, and the final paper will be worth 30%. The remaining 30% of the overall grade will comprise short writing assignments, participation, discussion posts, and student led discussion or presentations.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Country Music

42820 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 6
Wr

Randy Travis once said that “country music tells a story about, and deals with, the way people live their lives and what they do.” This course investigates how the narratives in country music make implicit arguments about the broader culture from which they arise. Spanning the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, country music has often been considered the genre for authentic working class expression. This course will consider how this music’s instrumental content establishes mood and tone, and how lyrical content changes through time in response to shifting norms. Organized by major topics in the genre, this course will encourage students to interrogate how country musicians weigh in on discussions of class, gender, race, sexuality, regionalism, and rural vs. urban life. To examine such topics, students will gain a thorough understanding of the basics of classical rhetoric. Starting with the rhetoric within individual country songs, students will learn to wield the tools of rhetorical analysis. This analytical work will provide the foundation for students to research a topic in country music more extensively before making their own argument about how the genre promotes a particular rhetorical stance in response to a broad culturally relevant topic. 

List of Assignments and Grading Percentages

  • Short writing assignments 25%
  • Rhetorical Analysis 10%
  • Revision of Rhetorical Analysis 15%                             
  • Annotated bibliography 15%
  • Topic in Country Music Paper 10%
  • Revision of Topic in Country Music Paper 15%                             
  • Participation (Peer reviews, Quizzes, In-class Assignments) 10% 

Required Texts 

  • Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers, Mark Longaker and Jeffery Walker, Pearson, 2010. 
  • (Additional course readings and musical selections will be posted to Canvas)

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Country Music

42490 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 6
Wr

Randy Travis once said that “country music tells a story about, and deals with, the way people live their lives and what they do.” This course investigates how the narratives in country music make implicit arguments about the broader culture from which they arise. Spanning the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, country music has often been considered the genre for authentic working class expression. This course will consider how this music’s instrumental content establishes mood and tone, and how lyrical content changes through time in response to shifting norms. Organized by major topics in the genre, this course will encourage students to interrogate how country musicians weigh in on discussions of class, gender, race, sexuality, regionalism, and rural vs. urban life. To examine such topics, students will gain a thorough understanding of the basics of classical rhetoric. Starting with the rhetoric within individual country songs, students will learn to wield the tools of rhetorical analysis. This analytical work will provide the foundation for students to research a topic in country music more extensively before making their own argument about how the genre promotes a particular rhetorical stance in response to a broad culturally relevant topic. 

List of Assignments and Grading Percentages

  • Short writing assignments 25%
  • Rhetorical Analysis 10%
  • Revision of Rhetorical Analysis 15%                             
  • Annotated bibliography 15%
  • Topic in Country Music Paper 10%
  • Revision of Topic in Country Music Paper 15%                             
  • Participation (Peer reviews, Quizzes, In-class Assignments) 10% 

Required Texts 

  • Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers, Mark Longaker and Jeffery Walker, Pearson, 2010. 
  • (Additional course readings and musical selections will be posted to Canvas)

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34324 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.204
Wr

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor:  Fickling, T

Unique #:  34324

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  In this class we will discuss female authorship and the ways in which women’s artistic creations have sparked controversy.  Attending to a range of genres (short story, poetry, and novels) and a broad time span (early nineteenth century to late twentieth century), we will also look for how race and class intersect with gender and historical moment to condition the critical responses to these texts.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Flannery O’Connor: A Good Man Is Hard to Find, Gwendolyn Brooks: The Bean Eaters, Toni Morrison: The Bluest Eye, Mary Shelley: Frankenstein.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There will also be reaction/response papers (10% of the final grade).  Participation is vital and constitutes 20% of your grade.

 

Essay 1: 20%; Essay 2: 25%; Essay 3: 25%; Reading responses: 10%; Participation: 20%.

E 349S • Toni Morrison

35585 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 204
CDWr (also listed as AFR 372E)

E 349S  l  5-Toni Morrison

 

Instructor:  Fickling, T

Unique #:  35585

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 345

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison.  The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries.  Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises:  infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc.  Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

 

Required Reading (subject to change):  The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; God Help the Child.

 

Audio-Visual Aids:  Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

 

Requirements & Grading:  .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

 

ATTENDANCE:  Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself.  I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.  Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book.  No makeup for quizzes is permitted.  Course pack articles are required reading.

 

GRADING SCALE:  Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric.  Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage.  Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999.  The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

 

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.

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